Vues d’Iggo

Where curves cross

Inflation and the most recent COVID wave might be near to their peaks. However, both will remain a concern for investors and, particularly, how the virus continues to disrupt supply and distribution and thus prices. If both waves subside, investor confidence should improve, but 2022 looks like being a challenge. Bond returns were negative last year, and this year doesn’t look to be much different even if interest rate expectations are already on the money. Longer term, what happens to inflation is partly going to be determined by the energy transition and, particularly, how we further internalise the cost of carbon emissions.

Basic law 

Prices are the most important market signal. In my first ever economics lesson in high school, the professor made us draw supply and demand curves. I was sixteen and it was a eureka moment with the realisation that if supply and demand shifted, prices would respond. Sounds basic now doesn’t it? Maybe so, but it was that core principle that led to the pursuit of economics at University and as a career in the City of London. The basic principle of supply and demand should not be overlooked in today’s complex world. Inflation is higher because prices have responded to a shift in the global supply of and demand for goods, services and labour. Yes, inflation was beginning to tick a little higher in the US before the COVID-19 pandemic hit (it was 2.3% in December 2019 and had been higher in 2018 before there were signs of a Fed and global trade led slowdown) but it has been the pandemic that has created today’s inflation problem. Demand was able to hold up, supply fell. Just draw the curves.

Really bad

This is not to downplay inflation. Over the last year the rise in the broad price level has impacted on real incomes and real investment returns. In 2021 the US consumer price index rose by 7% (December to December). The US broad bond market index delivered a nominal total return of -1.58%. So real returns were -8.5% or so. As a bond investor you don’t want too many of those kinds of years. Unfortunately, 2022 might see something of a repeat with inflation set to average 4.5% according to the Bloomberg consensus of economic forecasters. Bond returns are very unlikely to match that. It is not just a US thing either. Real returns for the Euro-zone broad market index were -7.8% last year. The UK market is the same. So, in two out of the last four years, bond returns have been negative in real terms. This again reminds us that most marginal buyers of bonds are not driven by real return expectations but either by policy considerations (central banks) or balance sheet considerations (pension funds, insurance companies and banks). It is supply and demand but what drives supply and demand in the bond market is complex. That is why we put so much emphasis on these “technical” factors when we construct our bond market views.   

2022 a challenge for bonds 

The outlook for fixed income is not great in this respect. Inflation will remain high, even if we are close to peak year-on-year inflation rates. Total returns from bonds will struggle because interest rates are going up and the perceived supply and demand dynamics are changing as a result of less central bank buying and the upcoming shift towards central banks becoming net sellers. In recent times there has not been two consecutive years of negative broad market bond returns, but it is likely that we will see that this year. The main hope is that yields don’t rise too much and that underlying demand from certain investor groups will remain strong. Certainly, global pension funds are in good shape and have the opportunity to shift out of growth assets into fixed income to secure the current very healthy funding positions (for defined benefit schemes in selected markets).

Ongoing shock 

None of us have lived through such a shock to GDP growth as we saw in the first half of 2020. None of us have lived through the imposition of lockdowns and the implications of that for work, production, supply and social interactivity. It has been an unprecedented period. With hindsight it is no wonder prices have risen because they reflect dramatic shifts in supply in many markets. I read again this week that the number of container ships waiting to unload in Los Angeles ports was back to the highest level. That means delays to deliveries of goods and services and supply not matching demand. Prices will rise if demand is there to justify it. The danger is, of course, that wages rise in response to the higher cost of living and because of labour shortages and this then feeds back into even higher price increases. The jury is still out on how far down this wage-price spiral we have already gone.  

But hope?

Omicron might be a blessing in the end if it becomes the dominant variant of COVID-19. It seems to result in milder illness, especially amongst vaccinated people. There is more and more talk of COVID becoming endemic, meaning it will be easier to live with much like regular flu or the common cold. If that is the case then supply issues should ease and labour markets might see returning workers as COVID related reasons for not participating in the workforce will be reduced. Inflation eventually should respond as demand for goods and services is met by increased supply and reduced impediments to distribution. By 2023, bond returns should be returning to positive in real terms as a result. In the meantime, inflation linked bonds and high yield remain my favoured parts of the fixed income asset class.

Energy important

Longer term there are some concerns about the impact on the overall rate of inflation from the energy transition. Energy has contributed to the spike in inflation over the last year and, like many sectors, it will have been hit by COVID-19 related disruptions to labour, materials and distribution. There could also be an impact from a higher cost of capital restricting maintenance expenditure as marginal capital allocations are favouring the renewables sector. At the moment, crude oil and natural gas prices remain very elevated and this is causing political problems in many countries.  It will also feed into retail energy prices for a good while longer.

Carbon prices 

There is going to be a cost associated with the transition to net zero. Some of this will come from the difficulties of maintaining overall energy supply during the transition from fossil fuels to renewables and the cost frictions that will be associated with this. Other pressures will come from internalising the cost of carbon emissions to a much greater degree than is the case today. There are compliance markets that charge certain activities for generating carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions. However, a lot of the economy lies outside of these compliance markets. Companies are setting their own carbon reduction targets but there is also going to be a need for carbon offset strategies as well. These are required to move more quickly to net zero than technology and cost curves will allow. Voluntary carbon markets provide the opportunity for companies to offset part of their emissions and this is a growing sector with carbon offset supply coming in the form of renewable energy projects, nature-based solutions like reforestation and emerging technologies for CO2 removal.  A recent Mckinsey study suggested that the market for voluntary carbon credits could increase to as much as $50bn in the coming years. Other studies suggest an even bigger market. The problem is, at the moment, the market is fragmented and very heterogenous with differences in the quality of projects (how much carbon do they avoid/sequestrate) and what other benefits they bring. There are efforts underway to standardise the market which ultimately may lead to more transparent pricing for carbon alongside the prices generated in the existing compliance markets like the EU’s Emissions Trading System. The price of carbon at the moment in that system is around €80/tonne of CO2e. In the voluntary markets, prices are much lower and more varied. It will be interesting to see how this market evolves because there are additional benefits that will come from voluntary carbon offset projects (around biodiversity and employment and particularly in terms of North-South economic issues). It is likely that carbon prices do move higher through the increased policy need to encourage the energy transition and through increased demand from corporates for carbon offset measures to enhance their core emissions reduction plans. This could contribute to inflation in the future but the corresponding welfare benefits for the environment and the global economy will be a price worth paying.

This communication is intended for professional clients only and should not be viewed by or used with retail clients. Circulation must be restricted accordingly.
 
Information relating to investments may have been based on research and analysis undertaken or procured by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited for its own purposes and may have been made available to other members of the AXA Investment Managers Group who in turn may have acted upon it. This material should not be regarded as an offer, solicitation, invitation or recommendation to subscribe for any AXA investment service or product and is provided to you for information purposes only. The views expressed do not constitute investment advice and do not necessarily represent the views of any company within the AXA Investment Managers Group and may be subject to change without notice. No representation or warranty (including liability towards third parties), express or implied, is made as to the accuracy, reliability or completeness of the information contained herein.
 
Past performance is not a guide to future performance. The value of investments and the income from them can fluctuate and investors may not get back the amount originally invested. Investments in newer markets and smaller companies offer the possibility of higher returns but may also involve a higher degree of risk.
 
Issued in the UK by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the U.K. Registered in England and Wales, No: 01431068. Registered Office: 22 Bishopsgate, London, EC2N 4BQ.
Telephone calls may be recorded or monitored for quality. 

AXA Investment Managers nomme deux experts dans son équipe de Recherche

AXA Investment Managers (AXA IM) annonce la nomination de deux experts au sein de son équipe de Recherche afin de continuer à renforcer son expertise macroéconomique.

  • François Cabau est nommé Senior Eurozone Economist, effectif immédiatement. Auparavant Director-Senior European Economist chez Barclays à Londres, il travaille conjointement avec Hugo Le Damany, Economist, sur les sujets liés à la Zone Euro.
  • Claire Dissaux est nommée Senior Sovereign Emerging Market Credit Analyst, effectif immédiatement. Elle était auparavant Head of Global Economics & Strategy de Millennium Global.

François et Claire sont basés à Paris et reportent à David Page, Head of Macro Research.

 

Biographies

François Cabau

François Cabau a commencé sa carrière comme Research Associate chez Société Générale CIB. En 2010, il rejoint Barclays comme European Economist, puis comme Senior European Economist en 2014 avant d’être nommé Director-Senior European Economist en 2018.

François Cabau est titulaire d’une licence en économie et en anglais de l’Université de Nanterre et d’un Master en diagnostic économique de l’Université Paris Dauphine.

 

Claire Dissaux

Claire Dissaux a commencé sa carrière en 1995 comme économiste au Ministère des Finances, avant d’être nommée Country Risk Analyst chez Société Générale en 1997. Elle rejoint Crédit Agricole Indosuez comme Emerging Market Economist en 1998 avant d’être nommée Head of Emerging Market Strategy en 2001. En 2007, elle est nommée Global Head Economics & Strategy de Millennium Global.

Claire Dissaux est diplômée de l’ENSAE en qualité d’économiste-statisticienne. Elle est également titulaire d’une licence en mathématiques de l’Université Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie et d’un DEA en macroéconomie, modélisation et prévisions à court-terme de l’Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne. 

Contacts

Hélène Caillet

+33 1 44 45 88 06

helene.caillet@axa-im.com

Alexis Doublet

+33 1 44 45 84 03

alexis.doublet@axa-im.com

Servane Taslé

+33 6 66 58 84 28

servane@steeleandholt.com

À propos d’AXA Investment Managers

AXA Investment Managers (AXA IM) est un gestionnaire d’actifs responsable qui investit activement sur le long terme pour la prospérité de ses clients, de ses collaborateurs et de la planète.

Avec environ 879 milliards d’euros d’actifs sous gestion à fin septembre 2021, notre gestion de conviction nous permet d’identifier les opportunités d’investissement que nous considérons comme les meilleures du marché à l’échelle mondiale dans les différentes classes d’actifs alternatives et traditionnelles.

AXA IM est un leader sur le marché de l’investissement vert, social et durable, avec 577 milliards d’euros d’actifs intégrant des critères ESG, durables ou à impact, à fin septembre 2021.

Nous nous sommes engagés à atteindre l’objectif de zéro émission nette de gaz à effet de serre d’ici 2050 pour l’ensemble de nos actifs, et à intégrer les considérations ESG dans nos activités, de la sélection des titres à notre culture d’entreprise en passant par la façon dont nous gérons nos opérations au quotidien. Nous souhaitons apporter de la valeur à nos clients grâce à des solutions d’investissement responsables, tout en suscitant des changements significatifs pour la société et l’environnement.

A fin juin 2021, AXA IM emploie plus de 2 488 collaborateurs dans le monde, répartis dans 26 bureaux et 20 pays. AXA IM fait partie du Groupe AXA, un leader mondial de l’assurance et de la gestion d’actifs.

Consultez notre site internet : www.axa-im.com

Suivez-nous sur Twitter @AXAIM et @AXAIM_FR

Suivez-nous sur LinkedIn

Visitez notre espace presse : www.axa-im.com/fr/media-centre

Publié par AXA Investment Managers Paris – Tour Majunga – 6, place de la Pyramide – 92908 Paris La Défense cedex. Société de gestion de portefeuille titulaire de l’agrément AMF N° GP 92-08 en date du 7 avril 1992. S.A. au capital de 1 384 380 euros immatriculée au registre du commerce et des sociétés de Nanterre sous le numéro 353 534 506.

Ce communiqué de presse ne doit pas être considéré comme une offre, une sollicitation, une invitation ou une recommandation à souscrire un service ou produit d’investissement et est fourni à titre d’information uniquement. Aucune décision financière ne doit être effectuée sur la base des informations fournies. Ce communiqué de Presse est émis à la date indiquée. Il ne constitue pas une publicité financière telle que définie par le droit français. Il est émis dans un but d’information. Les performances passées ne sauraient préjuger des résultats futurs. Les opinions exprimées ne constituent pas un conseil en investissement, ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de l’une des sociétés du Groupe AXA Investment Managers et sont susceptibles de changer sans préavis.  Nous ne faisons aucune déclaration ni n’offrons aucune garantie explicite ou implicite (y compris à l’égard de tiers) quant à l’exactitude, la fiabilité ou l’exhaustivité des informations contenues dans ce document. Toute mention de stratégie n'est pas destinée à être promotionnelle et n'indique pas la disponibilité d'un véhicule d'investissement.

Premier rapport annuel du 30 % Club France Investor Group : les grandes entreprises françaises doivent accélérer pour atteindre l’objectif de diversité femmes/hommes fixé par la coalition

Le 30 % Club France Investor Group annonce aujourd’hui la publication de son premier rapport annuel. Lancé en novembre 2020 par six sociétés de gestion françaises[1], et avec l’objectif de promouvoir une meilleure diversité femmes/hommes au sein des instances dirigeantes des sociétés du SBF 120[2] d’ici 2025, le groupe d’investisseurs compte aujourd’hui onze membres représentant plus de 5 500 milliards d’euros d’actifs sous gestion[3].

« Près de 70 % des grandes entreprises françaises n’ont pas encore assez de femmes dans leurs instances de direction[4]. Des progrès ont été réalisés l’an dernier, mais il faudrait en moyenne plus de six ans aux sociétés du SBF 120 pour atteindre au minimum 30 % de femmes dans leurs comités de direction. Il est donc urgent de continuer à les accompagner sur ce sujet clé, en favorisant la prise de conscience et la mise en place de plan d’actions concrets afin d’accélérer la tendance », ont déclaré les membres du 30 % Club France Investor Group.

En 2021, les actions du groupe d’investisseurs se sont focalisées sur trois domaines principaux :

1. Un engagement « soft » pour informer les 120 grandes entreprises françaises de l’existence de la coalition, collecter les premières données et proposer des indicateurs de performance communs pour être en capacité de mesurer les progrès.

Cette première action a permis de retirer 3 enseignements :

  • il existe un manque de consistance dans la façon dont les entreprises mesurent leurs données liées à la diversité,
  • on observe un manque de granularité et de transparence sur des données clés sur lesquelles les entreprises doivent s’améliorer,
  • les indicateurs de performance proposés par la coalition d’investisseurs semblent être des demandes possibles et raisonnables, une entreprise ayant réussi à reporter l’ensemble de ces indicateurs.

Ces 11 indicateurs relèvent des thèmes suivants : gouvernance, attraction des talents, qualité des postes, promotion, rétention, équilibre vie pro-vie personnelle, égalité des salaires, harcèlement sexuel, chaîne d’approvisionnement, certification/audit, principes d’autonomisation des femmes.

2. La mise en place d’un dialogue avec les entreprises qui sont les plus en retard sur les sujets de diversité de genre afin de les aider à progresser.

23 entreprises ont été identifiées comme des « laggards » (des retardataires) et ont été ciblées pour des actions d’engagement urgentes. Chaque membre de la coalition étant en charge d’une ou deux entreprises, 14 réunions ont pu être menées en présentiel avec ces entreprises et 9 autres ont été réalisées par échange d’emails, en 2021.

Au sein de ce groupe d’entreprises, on observe un déséquilibre en fonction des secteurs dans lesquels opèrent ces entreprises :

  • Au sein des secteurs des STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics), malgré une part de femmes historiquement basse, les entreprises ont montré une forte volonté de s'améliorer, elles ont pris des engagements clairs (à la fois pour attirer plus de femmes dans les entreprises et pour s'assurer qu'elles aient accès à des postes de direction) et ont manifesté leur volonté de continuer à échanger avec le groupe d'investisseurs pour s’améliorer.
  • Les secteurs à fort taux d'emploi féminin (Finance et Consommation) souffrent d’un véritable plafond de verre. Bien que les entreprises aient mis en place des cibles et des stratégies, certaines entreprises de ces secteurs ont encore un long chemin à parcourir pour lutter contre ce plafond de verre.

« La majorité des entreprises rencontrées sont convaincues de l’intérêt de la diversité de genre. Nous avons commencé à voir émerger une dynamique positive sous la forme de plans d’actions et d’objectifs ciblés, mais nous espérons voir des progrès encore plus tangibles en 2022. En plus de l’engagement « soft », nous avons organisé 14 rendez-vous avec les entreprises durant cette première année. Nous espérons accroître ce chiffre en 2022, à mesure que grandit la coalition. », ont déclaré Molly Minton d’Amundi et Liudmila Strakodonskaya d’AXA Investment Managers, analystes ESG et co-présidentes du 30 % Club France Investor Group en 2021, année inaugurale de la coalition d'investisseurs.

3. La mise en place de partenariats avec « les amis du 30 % Club France Investor Group ».

L’effort collectif est au cœur de l’action de la coalition. Cela passe par la volonté de fédérer les acteurs de l'industrie autour d'un objectif commun de 30 % en partageant des connaissances et des bonnes pratiques ainsi que des conseils sur la façon d'atteindre cet objectif. Des échanges ont été réalisés sur le partage de données avec différents acteurs de l'industrie comme le Medef, ainsi que des experts des sujets de diversité femmes/hommes.

D’autres actions seront menées en ce sens en 2022.

La co-présidence du 30 % Club France Investor Group par Amundi et AXA Investment Managers touche à sa fin. Allianz Global Investors dirigera la coalition en 2022, avec Marie-Sybille Connan, Senior Stewardship Analyst, en tant que présidente : « En tant qu’investisseurs actifs des sociétés dans lesquelles nous investissons, nous poursuivrons nos efforts et engagerons de manière constructive avec elles afin de les sensibiliser, de comprendre leurs défis et de favoriser le changement. Nous espérons que nos convictions attireront également un nombre croissant d'investisseurs afin de venir renforcer cette coalition. Avec davantage d'investisseurs à bord, nous serons plus à même d’atteindre un objectif pertinent pour les entreprises et la société. »

Pour accéder au rapport et découvrir l’intégralité du bilan, les chiffres clés, les études de cas, et la liste des indicateurs de performance, cliquez ici.

 

[1] Voir : https://presse.axa-im.fr/content/-/asset_publisher/zgi7EHNLfZcd/content/six-societes-de-gestion-appellent-les-grandes-capitalisations-francaises-a-etablir-un-plan-d-actions-afin-d-avoir-au-moins-30-de-femmes-dans-leurs-i/24052

[2] Le SBF 120 est un indice boursier français sur la bourse de Paris qui compte les 120 valeurs les plus liquides du marché primaire et secondaire français. Il intègre les sociétés du CAC 40 ainsi que 80 autres sociétés cotées dont les valeurs sont les plus liquides.

[3] A fin avril 2021.

[4] Selon les données du 30% Club France Investor Group en 2021.

Contacts

AMUNDI - Alexandre Barat

+ 33 1 76 32 43 25

alexandre.barat@amundi.com

AXA INVESTMENT MANAGERS - Hélène Caillet

+33 (0) 1 44 45 88 06 / +33 (0) 6 66 58 84 28

helene.caillet@axa im.com

ALLIANZ GLOBAL INVESTORS - Marion Leblanc-Wohrer

+33 (0) 1 73 05 77 91 / +33 (0) 6 85 15 74 54

marion.leblancwohrer@allianzgi.com

A propos du 30 % Club France Investor Group

Le 30% Club est une campagne mondiale visant à accroître la diversité de genre au sein des instances dirigeantes des sociétés. En 2010, la campagne a été lancée au Royaume-Uni et compte désormais des chapitres dans le monde entier, certains étant soutenus par des groupes d'investisseurs dédiés locaux. En novembre 2020, six sociétés de gestion ont décidé de créer un groupe d'investisseurs en France. Le 30% Club France Investor Group compte désormais 12 membres représentant environ 5 500 milliards d'euros d'actifs sous gestion. L’objectif de la coalition est d’engager avec les sociétés dans lesquelles elles investissent et de faire pression pour qu'au moins 30 % des sièges du comité exécutif soient pourvus par des femmes d'ici 2025. Elle cherche également à accroître les attentes en matière de divulgation d’indicateurs sur le thème de la diversité de genre. Pour le 30 % Club Investor Group, la parité hommes-femmes au sein des conseils d'administration et de la haute direction encourage un meilleur leadership et une meilleure gouvernance, la diversité et l'inclusion contribuent à la performance globale du conseil d'administration et, à termes, augmentent la performance de l'entreprise pour les entreprises elles-mêmes et leurs actionnaires.

Publié par AXA Investment Managers Paris – Tour Majunga – 6, place de la Pyramide – 92908 Paris La Défense cedex. Société de gestion de portefeuille titulaire de l’agrément AMF N° GP 92-08 en date du 7 avril 1992. S.A. au capital de 1 384 380 euros immatriculée au registre du commerce et des sociétés de Nanterre sous le numéro 353 534 506.

Ce communiqué de presse ne doit pas être considéré comme une offre, une sollicitation, une invitation ou une recommandation à souscrire un service ou produit d’investissement et est fourni à titre d’information uniquement. Aucune décision financière ne doit être effectuée sur la base des informations fournies. Ce communiqué de Presse est émis à la date indiquée. Il ne constitue pas une publicité financière telle que définie par le droit français. Il est émis dans un but d’information. Les performances passées ne sauraient préjuger des résultats futurs. Les opinions exprimées ne constituent pas un conseil en investissement, ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de l’une des sociétés du Groupe AXA Investment Managers et sont susceptibles de changer sans préavis.  Nous ne faisons aucune déclaration ni n’offrons aucune garantie explicite ou implicite (y compris à l’égard de tiers) quant à l’exactitude, la fiabilité ou l’exhaustivité des informations contenues dans ce document. Toute mention de stratégie n'est pas destinée à être promotionnelle et n'indique pas la disponibilité d'un véhicule d'investissement.

Vues d’Iggo

Beware the sirens’ call

The decision to put cash into markets this year depends on when investors think the interest rate cycle is properly priced. Getting there might be tricky. Higher bond yields and some growth uncertainties have provided a stuttering start to equity markets. A reduced gap between equity and bond returns is certainly one outcome for the year. In the short term, we need to watch the inflation and COVID-19 numbers and markets could be more volatile. Patience is the hardest virtue sometimes. Beware the sirens’ call.

Expectations re-set

Welcome to 2022 and a Happy New Year. I hope everyone was able to have some rest and peace over the holiday season. As we get back to work, markets have quickly shown us that there is much to be concerned about this year. I suggested in my last note that a key risk would be that we have all mis-priced the monetary policy cycle, meaning rates will go higher more quickly than was thought. The minutes from the last Federal Reserve Open Market Committee, which were released on January 5th, underlined that risk. They more than hinted that rate hikes could start sooner and that the central bank’s balance sheet could be reduced more aggressively. While this says nothing about the end-game of the coming monetary policy cycle – the Fed’s terminal interest rate forecast is still 2.5% – the journey there could be bumpier.

Real yields on the move 

The big reaction to the minutes was a 30 basis points (bps) jump in real yields at the 10-year maturity of the curve. I have discussed real yields extensively in the past from both a secular and cyclical point of view. The focus now is very much on the cyclical. Previous recent monetary tightening cycles in the US have seen real yields rise. This has not been on a one-for-one basis but has been enough to push nominal yields higher. It looks as though this process is happening again and both earlier Fed rate hikes and a more aggressive reduction in the balance sheet will potentially force real yields higher. It tends to a view at the moment that bond returns will struggle until the markets have settled on a new consensus for the path of rates. Of course, the Fed is not all the story.   

There are growth risks as well

If 2022 was characterised by continued economic recovery in the face of a receding pandemic and easing of supply disruptions and labour shortages, then confidence in the path of interest rates would be higher. However, we are in the midst of a fourth wave of the pandemic. While hospitalisation and death rates are lower than in previous waves – thanks to vaccination programmes – there is still disruption being done. Note the widespread cancellation of airline flights over the holidays and the shortages of public sector and other workers being reported in many economies. This is bound to create some downside growth risks in the short-term. In addition, there is no let-up in the global surge in energy prices. This tax on incomes will add to the growth uncertainties. So even though bond markets are super-sensitive to central bank messaging and have priced in more in terms of rate hikes than was the case a few weeks ago, there has to be a scenario in which the normalisation of policy is delayed.

Not again

All of this creates uncertainty. Bond yields have risen to their 2021 highs. For those investors concerned about growth and the ability of equity markets to sustain the performance of the last two years, these yield levels offer some defensive protection. On the equity side earnings momentum and revisions data suggest a 5%-10% total return expectation is reasonable this year. The most recent data from analysts is more negative in terms of EPS growth for Europe relative to the US but it remains the case that the US market is more highly valued. I would remind readers again that the rise in bond yields may force some re-ratings of equities – this is perhaps already happening at the index and sector levels.

Mean reversion anyone?

Globally, equity returns have massively outperformed. Using the MSCI world total return index and the ICE global bond market index, stocks beat bonds by 26% in the year to December 2021. In the initial COVID-19 recovery period between March 2020 and March 2021 the outperformance was 40%. My hunch is that we won’t see such an outcome this year. Some mean reversion is likely. In the US the gap between the earnings yield on the S&P500 and the 10-year US Treasury yield is 2.88%. This is lower than for any other market and lower than it has been for most of the QE period. If bond yields do spike higher the risk of an equity correction moves correspondingly.

Wealth growth stalling?

If equity-bond relative returns are less in 2022, it is more likely to be because of falling equity markets than a significant jump higher in bond returns. It would be because of a surge in risk-off behaviour brought about by the uncertain economic and policy outlook. I think investors should be prepared that total wealth doesn’t grow as much as it has in the last couple of years. For now, I stick with the view that short-duration high yielding fixed income and inflation linked-bonds remain attractive, as do income generating floating rate instruments. So far there has been no evidence of any deteriorating in credit quality. On the equity side, it may be a case of waiting for better valuations or sticking with a long-term view. There are many mega-trends that will drive equity returns over the coming years, mostly centred around de-carbonisation, further digitalisation and social considerations (healthcare, leisure, new trends in life-work balance). As always with investing, it depends on your time horizon and your risk tolerance.

This communication is intended for professional clients only and should not be viewed by or used with retail clients. Circulation must be restricted accordingly.
 
Information relating to investments may have been based on research and analysis undertaken or procured by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited for its own purposes and may have been made available to other members of the AXA Investment Managers Group who in turn may have acted upon it. This material should not be regarded as an offer, solicitation, invitation or recommendation to subscribe for any AXA investment service or product and is provided to you for information purposes only. The views expressed do not constitute investment advice and do not necessarily represent the views of any company within the AXA Investment Managers Group and may be subject to change without notice. No representation or warranty (including liability towards third parties), express or implied, is made as to the accuracy, reliability or completeness of the information contained herein.
 
Past performance is not a guide to future performance. The value of investments and the income from them can fluctuate and investors may not get back the amount originally invested. Investments in newer markets and smaller companies offer the possibility of higher returns but may also involve a higher degree of risk.
 
Issued in the UK by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the U.K. Registered in England and Wales, No: 01431068. Registered Office: 22 Bishopsgate, London, EC2N 4BQ.
Telephone calls may be recorded or monitored for quality. 

Gilles Guibout, responsable des actions européennes chez AXA IM, commente l’évolution des marchés actions en Europe en décembre et les perspectives pour les semaines à venir

Les marchés actions européens ont clôturé le dernier mois de l’année sur la deuxième plus forte hausse mensuelle de 2021, surperformant par la même occasion les marchés américains et asiatiques. Les investisseurs ont en effet été rassurés sur les conséquences du variant Omicron qui s’avèrent moins perturbantes que les anticipations initiales. Au niveau des banques centrales, la Fed a décidé de durcir sa position pour lutter contre l’inflation et a accéléré son tapering tandis que la BCE a de son côté annoncé la fin de son programme d’urgence (PEPP) adopté pendant la crise en mars 2020. Mais si la Fed anticipe désormais trois hausses de taux en 2022, rien ne laisse anticiper une première hausse de taux en Europe avant 2023, au plus tôt.

Sur le mois, le DJ Eurostoxx dividendes réinvestis bondit de 5,08 % au 30 décembre, date de la dernière valeur liquidative. Si tous les secteurs boursiers enregistrent une performance positive, les plus fortes hausses concernent ceux liés à la réouverture des économies (matières premières, industrielles, financières) tandis que les secteurs défensifs (immobilier, télécom, services aux collectivités) sont moins recherchés.  

Au cours des prochaines semaines, apparemment rassurés par la moindre pression du variant Omicron sur les systèmes de santé malgré une contagiosité plus forte, les investisseurs devraient porter leur attention sur les premières publications de résultats annuels afin d’y déceler les potentiels impacts des hausses de coût subies depuis l’été.

En fin de mois, l’élection présidentielle italienne pourrait raviver les craintes quant à la capacité du gouvernement à réformer le pays et faire resurgir momentanément des tensions sur les spreads souverains.

Au-delà, la croissance mondiale devrait rester soutenue cette année et constituer un soutien pour la croissance bénéficiaire des entreprises, mais il faudra porter une attention particulière à l’évolution de l’inflation qui devrait être fortement scrutée compte tenu de ses probables implications sur le rythme de sortie des politiques monétaires accommodantes. Une inflation supérieure aux attentes pourrait entraîner une remontée plus forte qu’attendue des taux et provoquer ainsi une contraction des multiples de valorisation des marchés actions, notamment sur les valeurs de croissance dont la prime a rarement été aussi élevée.

Face à un marché actions toujours très largement polarisé entre les valeurs de croissance, portées par les taux bas et les valeurs dites « value » du fait d’une moindre visibilité, il nous semble toujours essentiel de maintenir une bonne diversification au sein du portefeuille afin de limiter les expositions à un facteur en particulier afin de pouvoir faire face à différents scénarios.

Nous continuons d’être sélectifs dans notre choix de valeurs et si nous privilégions toujours les sociétés offrant un réel potentiel de croissance du chiffre d’affaires et/ou des marges, nous cherchons également les sociétés qui ont entamé un processus de transformation crédible de leur modèle économique offrant une perspective de remontée de la profitabilité et un potentiel de revalorisation.

Contacts

Hélène Caillet

+33 1 44 45 88 06

helene.caillet@axa-im.com

Julie Marie

+33 1 44 45 50 62

julie.marie@axa-im.com

Alexis Doublet

+33 1 44 45 84 03

alexis.doublet@axa-im.com

Servane Taslé

+33 6 66 58 84 28

servane@steelandholt.com

À propos d’AXA Investment Managers

AXA Investment Managers (AXA IM) est un gestionnaire d’actifs responsable qui investit activement sur le long terme pour la prospérité de ses clients, de ses collaborateurs et de la planète.

Avec environ 879 milliards d’euros d’actifs sous gestion à fin septembre 2021, notre gestion de conviction nous permet d’identifier les opportunités d’investissement que nous considérons comme les meilleures du marché à l’échelle mondiale dans les différentes classes d’actifs alternatives et traditionnelles.

AXA IM est un leader sur le marché de l’investissement vert, social et durable, avec 577 milliards d’euros d’actifs intégrant des critères ESG, durables ou à impact, à fin septembre 2021.

Nous nous sommes engagés à atteindre l’objectif de zéro émission nette de gaz à effet de serre d’ici 2050 pour l’ensemble de nos actifs, et à intégrer les considérations ESG dans nos activités, de la sélection des titres à notre culture d’entreprise en passant par la façon dont nous gérons nos opérations au quotidien. Nous souhaitons apporter de la valeur à nos clients grâce à des solutions d’investissement responsables, tout en suscitant des changements significatifs pour la société et l’environnement.

A fin juin 2021, AXA IM emploie plus de 2 488 collaborateurs dans le monde, répartis dans 26 bureaux et 20 pays. AXA IM fait partie du Groupe AXA, un leader mondial de l’assurance et de la gestion d’actifs.

Consultez notre site internet : www.axa-im.com

Suivez-nous sur Twitter @AXAIM et @AXAIM_FR

Suivez-nous sur LinkedIn

Visitez notre espace presse : www.axa-im.com/fr/media-centre

Publié par AXA Investment Managers Paris – Tour Majunga – La Défense 9 – 6, place de la Pyramide – 92800 Puteaux. Société de gestion de portefeuille titulaire de l’agrément AMF N° GP 92-08 en date du 7 avril 1992 S.A au capital de 1.421.906 euros immatriculée au registre du commerce et des sociétés de Nanterre sous le numéro 353 534 506.

Ce communiqué de presse ne doit pas être considéré comme une offre, une sollicitation, une invitation ou une recommandation à souscrire un service ou produit d’investissement et est fourni à titre d’information uniquement. Aucune décision financière ne doit être effectuée sur la base des informations fournies. Ce communiqué de Presse est émis à la date indiquée. Il ne constitue pas une publicité financière telle que définie par le droit français. Il est émis dans un but d’information. Les performances passées ne sauraient préjuger des résultats futurs. Les opinions exprimées ne constituent pas un conseil en investissement, ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de l’une des sociétés du Groupe AXA Investment Managers et sont susceptibles de changer sans préavis.  Nous ne faisons aucune déclaration ni n’offrons aucune garantie explicite ou implicite (y compris à l’égard de tiers) quant à l’exactitude, la fiabilité ou l’exhaustivité des informations contenues dans ce document. Toute mention de stratégie n'est pas destinée à être promotionnelle et n'indique pas la disponibilité d'un véhicule d'investissement.

Vues d’Iggo

More Jabs needed

Inflation and Omicron pose major concerns for investors and policy makers as 2021 draws to a close. If there was a massive push towards raising vaccination rates in emerging economies in early 2022, the risk outlook would improve. An end to the pandemic would help restore supply chains and remove distortions to businesses. This would help pull the rug from under some of the drivers of inflation. In the meantime, investors will need to hedge against inflation and rate hikes. Diversification and climate mitigation need to be key principles for investors in what appears to be a more uncertain outlook again. But bulls need jabs. 

Transitory gone

The current Bloomberg economists’ consensus forecast for the monthly change in the US consumer prices index for November is 0.7%. That would translate into a 6.8% year-on-year inflation rate and more or less ensure that US headline inflation will remain above 6% at the beginning of 2022. Falling oil prices will help bring headline inflation down but the numbers are likely to confirm the need to “retire” the word transitory – as suggested by Federal Reserve (Fed) Chair, Jerome Powell, last week. All being well, year-on-year inflation will head lower next year but it is likely to remain above at least 4% for most of the next twelve months. Inflation and its consequences for rates, bond yields and equity multiples will remain a major theme for investors, as I discussed last week. Prospective standalone bond returns, for the most part, don’t look as though they will match prospective inflation over the next year. Inflation linked or something very high yielding remain the best bets.

Headwinds

Rates and inflation are some of the headwinds investors face. Another is the potential for activity to be broadly disrupted again by the Omicron variant. Equity volatility has responded to announcements from around the world of new travel and social distancing restrictions and it might get worse before it gets better. The combination of weaker growth and higher inflation demands higher risk premiums across asset classes.

Mean-reversion?

Market performance through 2021 has reflected the reflationary phase the world economy has gone through. Best performers have been high beta equity assets while the worst performers, generally, have been long-duration fixed income assets whose return profile is the most sensitive to change in interest rate expectations. The difference in total return between the S&P Growth index and the US Treasury 10-yr plus index has been 30%. History suggests that the gap will not be as big next year – there could be some mean-reversion in relative returns. I have always stressed that long-duration bond returns and returns from risk assets are negatively correlated when it matters. Having a balanced bond-equity approach over the next year might not be a bad idea. Over the last 25 years, taking these two representative indices, every year of negative equity returns has been met with positive bond returns. Bonds hedge equities but the bond exposure has to be more or less as volatile as the equities, but in the opposite direction when things turn risk-bearish.

Defence

There are plenty of defensive options if you are worried about 2022 being a less positive year. Floating rate-linked and short-duration fixed investment instruments have little downside risk even when they are heavily credit loaded such as asset-backed securities and CLOs. Credit risk remains low in my opinion but in the longer-duration fixed income world of credit, the excess return offered by the credit spread might not be enough should the duration component of return continue to be volatile. Essentially investment grade corporate bond returns have been flat this year and I can’t see that changing unless there is a huge decline risk-free yields.

COP26 and climate risks

On a more secular theme, responding to climate change is going to become increasingly important for investors. While there were a lot of good things to come out of the COP26, the key takeaway is that there is no guarantee that the world is on a path to stop the rise in atmospheric temperatures exceeding 1.5oC by 2050. Thus, both physical and transitions risks will become more material for companies and investors. If we are a long way from global temperatures peaking, extreme weather events and environmental disasters are likely to be more frequent. Investors are exposed to losses resulting from these events impacting on businesses through damage to physical assets, disruptions to production and distribution, and increased costs through insurance and mitigation requirements. In addition, because we are not on the right path yet, the transition risks will build as there will be more urgency from policy makers, increased pressure on business models from investors and consumers, and from the technology needs required to shift to low carbon.

Pricing risk

It’s becoming more commonplace and more credible to identify these climate risks and put a price on them. More widespread application of carbon pricing would help in that respect, but valuation models can incorporate different carbon pricing scenarios to assess potential value-at-risk. What is less clear is whether these risks are rewarded via higher risk premiums on brown company assets. A cursory review of the academic literature on this is not conclusive. It makes sense that investors would seek a higher potential return on assets that have exposure to more physical or transition risk. This may become clearer as more investors allocate to green assets and away from brown ones. The more active and focused climate strategies will also incorporate a transition path so that there is clarity on future emissions, and therefore, risks associated with the companies in a portfolio.

Preparing

Diversification and managing carbon risk should be two principles for investing in the next few years. There is a need for protection as well, from inflation being higher and thus eroding real returns, and from the potential for a policy driven re-rating of assets. While supply issues may subside, the energy transition could continue to provoke bouts of higher inflation. Short-duration inflation strategies remain an attractive option in that respect. On the growth side, renewables and climate related technology and a broad exposure to digital trends will provide the longer-term growth. Regionally, Europe is less at risk from endemic inflation and monetary tightening than the US, and certainly on the equity side there is a valuation advantage in European stocks. Lastly, as I mentioned before, the value trade next year could be one driven by a recovery in Asian asset values.

More jabs everywhere

The most bullish development in 2022 would be something that created an end in sight to the pandemic. Vaccination rates in emerging economies need to be significantly increased to prevent the opportunity for additional mutations to take hold. There are very few countries with more than 80% of their populations being fully vaccinated.  More worryingly there are many emerging economies where vaccination rates are well below 50% - including populous nations like Indonesia (35.3%), Russia (39.6%) and South Africa (24.65) – data compiled by Our World in Data from national and international agencies. It really makes me think about international co-operation to deal with climate change being feasible when there is a collective failure to deal with something that we already have the tools for and experience of doing. If this doesn’t change, then there will be more waves of the disease, more impact on global trade and activity, and a growing risk of stagflation which would be extremely negative for investment returns. The breakthrough of vaccine developments in 2020 was a major fillip to markets – in 2022 we need to see real progress on the rollout of jabs to achieve global immunity and a real and more equal expansion of global wealth.

Willkommen

A new era begins for Manchester United with the departure of Michael Carrick in the wake of Ole Solskjaer’s dismissal a couple of weeks ago. Welcome Ralf. Another German manager in the Premier League. If he can have the impact that has been seen at Liverpool and Chelsea then bring it on.

This document is for informational purposes only and does not constitute investment research or financial analysis relating to transactions in financial instruments as per MIF Directive (2014/65/EU), nor does it constitute on the part of AXA Investment Managers or its affiliated companies an offer to buy or sell any investments, products or services, and should not be considered as solicitation or investment, legal or tax advice, a recommendation for an investment strategy or a personalized recommendation to buy or sell securities.

It has been established on the basis of data, projections, forecasts, anticipations and hypothesis which are subjective. Its analysis and conclusions are the expression of an opinion, based on available data at a specific date.

All information in this document is established on data made public by official providers of economic and market statistics. AXA Investment Managers disclaims any and all liability relating to a decision based on or for reliance on this document. All exhibits included in this document, unless stated otherwise, are as of the publication date of this document.

Furthermore, due to the subjective nature of these opinions and analysis, these data, projections, forecasts, anticipations, hypothesis, etc. are not necessary used or followed by AXA IM’s portfolio management teams or its affiliates, who may act based on their own opinions. Any reproduction of this information, in whole or in part is, unless otherwise authorised by AXA IM, prohibited.

Risk Warning

Vues d’Iggo

Ouch and happy holidays

The central banks are coming. The Bank of England was the front-runner in terms of rates with the Federal Reserve set to get ahead in winding down bond purchases. It’s a meaningful change in the setting of global monetary policies. But it’s no taper-tantrum and no rate shock. For now, bonds and equities can continue to perform but the big risk is that markets have collectively mis-priced what could be an unusual tightening cycle. 

Now, now

Central banks delivered a slap on the hand rather than a punch to the ribs but the message was clear, nevertheless. They are girding for the battle against inflation. Next year will see monetary policy conditions tighten. This is coming a little earlier than would have been the case if inflation was lower, but it was on the horizon anyway. There is just now more urgency to “normalise” policy in the face of inflation data which keeps surprising to the upside. For now, bond markets are comfortable with the idea that normalisation will be gradual and that inflationary pressures will ease in 2022. The risk is that markets are not pricing the coming cycle properly – understandable as we have never experienced a post-pandemic growth and inflation surge in modern times. What that means is the risks are to the upside for rates.

Different strokes

Not all monetary tightening is the same. In the UK the mantra seems to be “we are the BoE and we’ll do what we want”. In the US, sensitivity around communication means everything is well telegraphed in advance so markets have time to deal with the reduction in bond purchases and the likely three interest rate hikes in 2022. In Europe, it’s hard to get away from the status quo and everything, as usual, is about compromise. The hawks in Europe want a more rapid normalisation, the doves are concerned that this could re-open market fractures and spread widening amongst sovereign issuers within the Euro Area. For all the details of what happens with the Pandemic Emergency Purchase Programme (PEPP) and Asset Purchase Programme (APP), markets are left watching Greek and Italian bond spreads to see whether the European Central Bank can move forward on meeting the challenges of higher inflation in the zone. If the signs are bad, the Euro and European assets will disappoint.   

Now we wait

The circling of the central bank wagons does not yet quite constitute a full on attack on current growth and inflation dynamics. Monetary conditions will tighten but from a very accommodative base. And the current end-game is not that challenging for markets. The Federal Reserve is sticking with its long-term terminal rate expectation for the Fed Funds rate of 2.5% (which is zero in real terms given where inflation is likely to settle).  European interest rate lift-off is not likely to be in 2022. The futures market has 3-month sterling rates now higher than 1.25% over the next three years. In the short-term this is likely to be how things are. The Fed is not likely to do anything more at its next meeting at the end of January given the very high probability that the Omicron variant will be widespread in the US in the New Year. The same goes for the ECB and the BoE. Indeed, the UK hike sits uncomfortably with daily infection rates heading to 100,000 or more and parts of the economy already suffering again from either government imposed or voluntary social distancing.

Credit not rates

With that backdrop in mind and with the markets having priced at least the near-term likely path of interest rates, risk assets could trade in a relatively stable way over the next few months. A lot will depend on the inflation data of course and the recent re-acceleration of natural gas prices confirm the near-term upside risk. However, our teams just completed the quarterly review of the outlook for a range of asset classes and there was generally a constructive tone for credit, emerging markets and equities. Something that stood out is that alternative credit assets like asset-backed securities and collaterised loan obligations (CLOs). Credit quality is good, spreads on these instruments are attractive relative to fixed rate bonds and they have no duration exposure. In the ranking of asset classes scored by our portfolio management teams using our “macro, valuation, sentiment and technical” framework, leveraged loans, CLOs, small-cap equity and China feature in the top ten for now. At the bottom of the league it is mostly core interest rate assets.

Come on 2022

There’s not much more to be said. It’s been a strange year with people generally trying to behave like normal but always looking over the shoulder to see where the virus was at. Markets have delivered strong equity returns and flat bond returns which, with hindsight, is exactly what should have happened in a world of zero rates and above trend economic growth. We face a bit of a short-term stutter now – they may even postpone the Premier League for a while!  And 2022 holds a lot of uncertainty. First with the virus and just how bad or how mild Omicron will be. Second with inflation and whether another round of disruptions will prolong supply-side induced price pressures. Third with politics and the fact that current incumbent leaders in a number of western democracies are struggling. Joe Biden’s popularity has fallen, Boris Johnson has just suffered a humiliating by-election defeat and Emmanuel Macron faces a tough Presidential election challenge. The new German government is unproven, and Mario Draghi might fancy to swap the prime minister’s office for the Presidential one.

So have a great holiday season if you can. Manchester United are COVID-riven at the moment so I have no idea when the Ralf-Revolution will resume but there is a tasty match-up against Atleti at the end of February. Ooh a couple of days in Madrid, that would be nice, that would be normal.

Information relating to investments may have been based on research and analysis undertaken or procured by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited for its own purposes and may have been made available to other members of the AXA Investment Managers Group who in turn may have acted upon it. This material should not be regarded as an offer, solicitation, invitation or recommendation to subscribe for any AXA investment service or product and is provided to you for information purposes only. The views expressed do not constitute investment advice and do not necessarily represent the views of any company within the AXA Investment Managers Group and may be subject to change without notice. No representation or warranty (including liability towards third parties), express or implied, is made as to the accuracy, reliability or completeness of the information contained herein.
 
Past performance is not a guide to future performance. The value of investments and the income from them can fluctuate and investors may not get back the amount originally invested. Investments in newer markets and smaller companies offer the possibility of higher returns but may also involve a higher degree of risk.
 
Issued in the UK by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the U.K. Registered in England and Wales, No: 01431068. Registered Office: 22 Bishopsgate, London, EC2N 4BQ.

Investissement responsable

Playing with fire: Measuring emissions from the world’s oil and gas fields

  • There are significant differences in the greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint of oil and gas fields
  • Apart from so-called heavy oil fields, the geological nature of the resource is not connected to the GHG footprint
  • For both crude oil and natural gas production, methane emissions are the main driver of GHG intensity. For crude oil, flaring of associated gas is another major source of GHGs
  • The extent of flaring and escaped methane differs greatly based on the interplay between geography and regulation. Countries with strong regulatory oversight, such as Norway, rank well, while areas with less rigorous rules, including Iraq, Algeria, and Texas, perform poorly
  • We believe an assessment of GHG intensity and practices around venting and flaring at oil and gas producers should be a central part of any climate engagement by investors
  • Investors can and should favour producers with the lowest GHG intensities

 

Read the full report below.

This document is for informational purposes only and does not constitute investment research or financial analysis relating to transactions in financial instruments as per MIF Directive (2014/65/EU), nor does it constitute on the part of AXA Investment Managers or its affiliated companies an offer to buy or sell any investments, products or services, and should not be considered as solicitation or investment, legal or tax advice, a recommendation for an investment strategy or a personalized recommendation to buy or sell securities.

Due to its simplification, this document is partial and opinions, estimates and forecasts herein are subjective and subject to change without notice. There is no guarantee forecasts made will come to pass. Data, figures, declarations, analysis, predictions and other information in this document is provided based on our state of knowledge at the time of creation of this document. Whilst every care is taken, no representation or warranty (including liability towards third parties), express or implied, is made as to the accuracy, reliability or completeness of the information contained herein. Reliance upon information in this material is at the sole discretion of the recipient. This material does not contain sufficient information to support an investment decision.

© 2021 AXA Investment Managers. All rights reserved.

Analyses et stratégies d’investissement

La Macro et Omicron

Points clés

  • Omicron semble être moins sévère, mais « booster les boosters » à lui seul peut ne pas suffire à préserver la capacité des systèmes de santé
  • La Réserve Fédérale et la Banque Centrale Européenne ont un avis différent sur le risque d'inflation, et agissent en conséquence
  • Des facteurs macroéconomiques et techniques ont stimulé les rendements du marché
  • Les valorisations demeurent élevées et pourraient être remises en cause si l’inflation restait tendue
  • Le niveau des rendements réels reste à surveiller en 2022 – nous attendons une légère hausse sur l’année

Omicron au microscope

Nous espérions vraiment que pour le dernier éditorial avant la période des fêtes de 2021, nous n’aurions pas besoin d’évoquer à nouveau la pandémie. Malheureusement, l’émergence de la variante Omicron nous oblige à envisager un risque baissier pour notre scénario central pour 2022. Beaucoup de choses sont encore inconnues au moment où nous écrivons, mais certaines études quantifiées et sérieuses sont maintenant disponibles, nous permettant de tirer des conclusions provisoires sur l’impact possible sur l’économie mondiale.

L’Agence de sécurité sanitaire du Royaume-Uni a mené une étude sur 581 cas symptomatiques d’Omicron (sans indication de leur gravité). Deux doses d’Astra Zeneca n’offrent aucune protection statistiquement significative. Deux doses de Pfizer offrent une faible protection. Cependant, les boosters semblent fournir une protection décente, bien qu’inférieure à celle observée dans le cas du variant Delta. L’accélération du programme de rappel est la réponse logique. Cependant, avec une efficacité de 75%, même les rappels ne permettraient pas d’atteindre l’immunité collective (en supposant que les « hésitants au vaccin » puissent être convaincus). Cela ne suffit donc pas pour être rassuré. La gravité des symptômes en cas d’infection doit également être prise en compte.

Alors qu’Omicron se propage beaucoup plus rapidement que les versions précédentes du virus, jusqu’à présent en Afrique du Sud, il n’a pas déclenché d’augmentation significative du nombre de victimes. Cette observation empirique est maintenant étayée par une étude à grande échelle réalisée par la société d’assurance Discovery. Selon une analyse de 78 000 résultats de tests attribués à la variante par Discovery, la « gravité intrinsèque », c’est-à-dire la probabilité d’être hospitalisé, d’Omicron est inférieure de 29% à celle de la première version en corrigeant des effets du statut vaccinal. Deux doses de Pfizer fourniraient une protection de 70% contre les hospitalisations – tandis que la protection de 30% contre les infections symptomatiques confirme le message des données britanniques. L’étude n’explore pas l’efficacité des rappels, mais la conclusion logique est que cela augmenterait encore plus le niveau de protection contre l’hospitalisation.

Il n’est donc pas surprenant que les gouvernements se concentrent sur l’accélération des programmes de rappel comme alternative aux restrictions de mobilité sévères. Au rythme observé la semaine dernière – qui a déjà été dépassé – il faudrait 2 à 2,5 mois pour obtenir une troisième dose pour 75% de la population en Europe. Cela prendrait beaucoup plus de temps aux États-Unis (> 6 mois).

En outre, cela ne traiterait pas de la fraction de la population qui a jusqu’à présent rejeté les vaccins. L’introduction de restrictions conditionnelles au statut vaccinal individuel semble avoir un impact sur l’adoption des premières doses en Allemagne – où un nombre important d'« hésitants à la vaccination » subsiste. Il faudra toutefois attendre la fin de 2022 pour que ces « nouveaux convertis » atteignent le meilleur niveau de protection.

Au total, la combinaison d’une vitesse de propagation élevée de la variante et d’un nombre encore important de personnes sans aucune protection peut signifier que, même avec une gravité plus faible, des mesures restrictives supplémentaires seront nécessaires dans les semaines à venir en tant que « coupe-circuit » pour préserver les systèmes de santé. Cela nuirait à la croissance du PIB cet hiver, même s’il s’agirait probablement d’une simple pause dans la trajectoire de reprise. Nous ne sommes pas revenus à la case départ dans la lutte contre la pandémie.

Dans cet environnement incertain, les banques centrales affichent des attitudes différentes. La Réserve Fédérale (Fed) a clairement « basculé », exprimant ses inquiétudes quant au fait que le pic d’inflation actuel ne s’enracine et ne soit maintenant le résultat du fonctionnement endogène de l’économie. L’accélération de la stratégie de sortie en tant que telle n’est pas une surprise, mais nous pensions que cela permettrait simplement à la Fed d’évoquer la possibilité d’une série de hausses à partir du début de 2022. Que le membre médian du Comité de politique monétaire fédéral (FOMC) s'attende désormais à trois hausses l'année prochaine suggère déjà que nous ne sommes plus dans le domaine du possible, mais dans le domaine de l'intention. Nous pensons que ces mouvements hawkish, malgré le risque Omicron, reflètent une conviction de la Fed que, comme lors des vagues précédentes, la tolérance au risque sanitaire serait élevée aux Etats-Unis et qu'un ralentissement significatif de l'activité économique pourrait être évité. Ce qui est rassurant, c'est que le marché continue de croire que ce resserrement monétaire précoce suffira à étouffer l'inflation dans l'œuf, de sorte que les taux d'intérêt à long terme restent bas. Nous pensons toutefois que le risque « d’en faire trop » est tangible aux Etats-Unis. Nous sommes frappés par le fait que les anticipations d'inflation à 10 ans soient à nouveau inférieures à l'objectif de la Fed. Il semble donc que le marché obligataire prenne en compte le risque d'un ralentissement trop marqué de l’économie.

La Banque Centrale Européenne (BCE) adopte l'approche inverse. Même si l’assouplissement quantitatif (QE) sera réduit en 2022, il est toujours clair que le Conseil des gouverneurs ne veut pas augmenter les taux directeurs avant 2023. Nous pensons que cela a du sens. Les conditions macroéconomiques des deux côtés de l'Atlantique sont très différentes. Dans la zone euro, l'inflation reste essentiellement un phénomène exogène et l’écart de production reste négatif. Contrairement aux Etats-Unis, il n'y a pas de demande excédentaire que la banque centrale pourrait se permettre de freiner afin de contenir l'inflation.

Les valorisations pourraient-elles s'ajuster ?

L'inflation atteint des sommets inégalés depuis plusieurs décennies dans les économies développées. Les marchés ont anticipé le début d'un cycle de hausse des taux d'intérêt en 2022. Pourtant, les rendements obligataires à long terme restent faibles. Ils sont faibles par rapport aux taux d'inflation actuels et faibles par rapport à ce qu'ils étaient avant la pandémie de la COVID-19. Si les rendements obligataires ne peuvent pas augmenter en dépit d'une hausse de l'inflation et d'un resserrement monétaire, cela donne-t-il aux investisseurs le feu vert pour rester agressivement exposés aux actifs à risque sur les marchés du crédit et des actions ?

Avec nos équipes de gestion de portefeuille, nous évaluons régulièrement les perspectives de rendement au moyen d'un cadre prenant en compte les facteurs macroéconomiques, les valorisations, le climat de confiance des investisseurs et les facteurs techniques des marchés. Les tendances macroéconomiques ont été favorables, car l'environnement politique a permis une reprise rapide de la croissance et a soutenu les fondamentaux des entreprises. Cela s'est manifesté par une forte croissance des bénéfices par action sur les marchés d'actions et par de faibles taux de défaillance des entreprises. Un deuxième facteur important est d'ordre technique. Il est le plus évident sur les marchés obligataires, où les achats d'obligations par les banques centrales ont été une raison essentielle du maintien des rendements à un niveau aussi bas. Depuis des années, la prédominance des banques centrales a poussé les investisseurs en quête de rendement vers le crédit et le haut rendement, contribuant ainsi à contenir les coûts de financement des entreprises. Nous pouvons également voir comment la confiance a joué un rôle dans la conduite des marchés depuis 2020. L'élaboration et l'exécution des programmes de vaccination ont favorisé l'optimisme dans les perspectives des investisseurs et se sont traduites par une hausse des marchés boursiers à plusieurs reprises.

Tous ces moteurs positifs pour les marchés ont compressé le seul élément qui a continué de mettre les investisseurs mal à l'aise : les valorisations. À l'avenir, certains des autres moteurs seront moins favorables. La croissance restera positive, mais le dérivé de la croissance s'affaiblira – tant en termes de PIB que de bénéfices. Le support technique des obligations se détériorera également à mesure que la Réserve fédérale (Fed) réduira ses achats d'obligations. Le sentiment est déjà mis à mal par l'émergence du variant Omicron.

Les marchés obligataires et boursiers sont sans doute très chers dans l'environnement inflationniste actuel, en particulier aux Etats-Unis. Si l'inflation reste plus élevée que ce qui est actuellement prévu, un ajustement de la valorisation devient plus probable, signifiant des rendements plus élevés et des multiples cours-bénéfices plus faibles. Jusqu'à présent, le consensus prévoit une baisse de l'inflation en 2022. Dans un tel scénario, les attentes actuelles en matière de taux d'intérêt semblent appropriées et les marchés peuvent continuer à considérer avec un certain confort les suppléments de rendement apportés par les marchés du crédit et la croissance toujours historiquement solide des bénéfices dans le monde des actions. Les rendements n'atteindront peut-être pas les niveaux de 2021, mais une exposition au crédit, pour le portage, et aux actions mondiales est justifiée dans ce contexte.

La mesure clé à suivre pour prévenir un ajustement potentiellement systémique des valorisations est celle des rendements réels. Ils restent très négatifs mais devraient augmenter au cours de l'année prochaine. Cette hausse devrait être légère, conformément à un cycle de resserrement modeste de la Fed. Les rendements réels à court terme – dans la zone des cinq ans sur le marché américain par exemple – ont déjà commencé à se raffermir. Une hausse modeste des rendements réels ne devrait pas être trop préjudiciable mais permettrait aux rendements obligataires nominaux de commencer à dépasser la borne haute de la fourchette d’évolution observée en 2021 et pourrait limiter toute nouvelle expansion des « multiples » des actions américaines. Le risque d'un choc plus important sur les rendements réels existe, mais dans l’histoire récente, cela n'a été observé qu'en 2013, lorsque la Fed a surpris et ébranlé le marché dans ce qui est devenu le "taper tantrum" (annonce de la réduction du QE). Espérons que la Fed ait préparé le marché en conséquence cette fois-ci.

Des facteurs macroéconomiques et techniques légèrement moins porteurs, ainsi que certains risques en matière de valorisation, devraient se combiner pour donner lieu à des rendements proches de zéro pour les obligations d'Etat des pays « cœur », légèrement positifs pour le crédit et le haut rendement et à des rendements à un chiffre pour les actions mondiales. Pour l'instant, notre opinion reste donc constructive sur les actifs à risque, mais l'évolution des rendements réels sera déterminante à l'approche du cycle de relèvement des taux l'année prochaine.

   

 

AVERTISSEMENT

Ce document est exclusivement conçu à des fins d’information et ne constitue ni une recherche en investissement ni une analyse financière concernant les transactions sur instruments financiers conformément à la Directive MIF 2 (2014/65/UE) ni ne constitue, de la part d’AXA Investment Managers ou de ses affiliés une offre d’acheter ou vendre des investissements, produits ou services et ne doit pas être considérée comme une sollicitation, un conseil en investissement ou un conseil juridique ou fiscal, une recommandation de stratégie d’investissement ou une recommandation personnalisée d’acheter ou de vendre des titres financiers. Ce document a été établi sur la base d'informations, projections, estimations, anticipations et hypothèses qui comportent une part de jugement subjectif. Ses analyses et ses conclusions sont l’expression d’une opinion indépendante, formée à partir des informations disponibles à une date donnée.

Toutes les données de ce document ont été établies sur la base d’informations rendues publiques par les fournisseurs officiels de statistiques économiques et de marché. AXA Investment Managers décline toute responsabilité quant à la prise d’une décision sur la base ou sur la foi de ce document. L’ensemble des graphiques du présent document, sauf mention contraire, a été établi à la date de publication de ce document. Du fait de sa simplification, ce document peut être partiel et les informations qu’il présente peuvent être subjectives.

Par ailleurs, de par la nature subjective des opinions et analyses présentées, ces données, projections, scénarii, perspectives, hypothèses et/ou opinions ne seront pas nécessairement utilisés ou suivis par les équipes de gestion de portefeuille d’AXA Investment Managers ou ses affiliés qui pourront agir selon leurs propres opinions. Toute reproduction et diffusion, même partielles de ce document sont strictement interdites, sauf autorisation préalable expresse d’AXA Investment Managers.

Rédacteur : AXA Investment Managers – Tour Majunga, La Défense 9, 6 place de la Pyramide, 92800 Puteaux. Société anonyme immatriculée au registre du commerce et des sociétés de Nanterre sous le numéro 393 051 826.

Vues d’Iggo

Follow the curves

I can’t be too bearish on bonds because I can’t see real yields rising enough to push nominal bond yields well above the highs they have reached this year. Certainly not with countries edging back towards lockdowns. Much higher yields would only come if inflation was so persistent that central bankers decided they needed to really squash it. Only then would real yields rise enough to cause huge damage to bond and equity returns. The next six months will be “make or break” for both the pandemic and inflation. 

WFH again

This week the UK government announced measures that tip the country slightly back in the direction of lockdown in response to the threat posed by high existing levels of COVID-19 infections due to the Delta variant and the, as yet, unknown risk coming from the more virulent Omicron variant. There have been more social restrictions imposed in other countries too. It’s a far cry from the full lock-down of the Spring of 2020, but it reminds us that the global economy has not yet normalised. At the margin, over the next quarter or so, there will be additional disruptions to spending, employment, travel, leisure consumption and the provision of goods and services. There may also be increased pressure on health systems with the political repercussions that brings, especially with electorates weary from the pandemic and its impact.

Decisions

With hindsight it was clear what needed to be done to offset the economic impact of COVID. Rates were cut aggressively by central banks and spending was increased by governments. This sustained income and demand. In recent months the conversation in economic circles has been around reversing those stimulus policies and 2022 was shaping up to be the year of rate increases and some fiscal rowing back. Higher inflation is the macro force driving those policy expectations. But now what? Raise rates to tackle inflation, or stay in accommodative mode to offset any new negative impact from COVID?  

Pivot

You can infer most scenarios from how the bond market is currently priced. There are almost three rate hikes from the Fed priced in for 2022. For the UK it is almost four. The market differentiates between these two and the European Central Bank, pricing in less than one hike next year. Federal Reserve (Fed) Chair Powell signalled a more hawkish stance recently and since November 30 US markets have underperformed in both equity and fixed income space (EuroStoxx 1.98% vs S&P500 0.32%; German bunds 10-yr plus index 0.81% vs US Treasury 10-yr plus index 0.40%). Growth and technology heavy stocks have underperformed while value, Europe and emerging markets have outperformed.

Mixed signals

A lot has been priced in to the front-end of US and UK curves and markets have reacted. However, further along the yield curve is it not so clear. Benchmark yields are unchanged to lower compared to when Powell pivoted. Generally, yields are well within the ranges that they have traded in during 2021. The message from the bond market is that central banks might start tightening but the global economy will slow, and inflation will ease and, therefore, long-term interest rates don’t need to go up.

Ongoing confusion 

This schizophrenia is not likely to disappear. It means owning bond funds is not going to deliver very negative returns any time soon. It’s difficult to think central banks will raise rates when COVID-19 cases are rising globally. At any rate, to get to the same level of US and European bond yields that were reached in the last monetary tightening cycle – 2015-2018 – would require real yields to rise by a huge amount (280bps in the US and 115bps in Europe). I have not seen a single convincing argument as to what would drive that kind of move.

Do the math

Real yields rose (in a structurally declining trend) in the US in each of the three last tightening cycles. But not on a one-for-one basis with Fed Funds. Indeed, looking back, for every 1% increase in the Fed Funds rate, real 10-year yields only increased by 0.15%. If the Fed raises the Fed Funds target by 200bps, on this basis real 10-year yields will go up by 0.3%. Assuming inflation break-evens at 2.40%, that gives a 10-year nominal yield of 1.7%!

Bear stories

The bond bear story needs a convincing narrative on either a more aggressive Fed, a rise in real yields that we have only seen during the 2013 taper tantrum, or a rise in break-even inflation that suggests the Fed has lost control of long-term inflation expectations. If you are convinced with any of these narratives, then stay with bonds, especially credit where you can get more carry. And for bond markets in Europe the narrative towards much higher yields are even more negative. Perhaps, in the UK, the political, policy and inflation uncertainty requires a larger risk premium than in Bunds or Treasuries.

Messy

Early 2022 is going to be messy I think. Apart from the COVID-19/inflation issue there are growing geo-political concerns around Russia and Ukraine and around China’s stance towards Taiwan. In Europe, there is the potential for things to turn very badly in the UK where the government is under attack on a number of fronts and there is the French Presidential election in the Spring. A less clear growth and inflation outlook than in 2021 and more policy uncertainty surely adds up to a more difficult return environment. Equity index returns have been between 20%-30% in 2021. These are unlikely to be repeated.  

Q1 virus curve is key 

If it becomes clear that Omicron is not that serious and can contribute to the final endgame where COVID is concerned, then the outlook tilts to a more expansionary way. The next few weeks might see a huge wave of new cases related to the variant and then a rapid decline in cases as 2022 unfolds. But these things do take time as we have seen from previous waves. Under that more optimistic scenario, rates will rise and the focus will be on controlling inflation over the medium-term. What will determine market performance then is how the global economy responds. There is a lot of momentum in growth, in the effects of policy stimulus and in corporate earnings performance. What is priced into rates so far should not be that damaging. Bond yields could rise (notwithstanding the real yield issue) and that could provide a positive signal for cyclicals again – I would expect European and Emerging Market equities to perform better. Lastly, look at China. The policy easing announced this week has propelled Chinese equities to being the best performing market.

Enjoy the holidays before the “fun” starts again

Keep open minded until we have more data points in the New Year. It’s going to be a make or break year for inflation – do we revert to pre-pandemic levels of 2% or lower inflation, or have we moved into a higher regime? Inflation linked markets in the US currently price in a 5-year inflation rate that is above the moving 5-year average of realised inflation. Does this represent an increased inflation risk premium? Probably. The worst case scenario is that central bankers take the view that they need to crush inflation – real yields would then rise and economic growth would respond negatively. This a possible outcome but we need to wait and see a little longer as to what the data brings.

Information relating to investments may have been based on research and analysis undertaken or procured by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited for its own purposes and may have been made available to other members of the AXA Investment Managers Group who in turn may have acted upon it. This material should not be regarded as an offer, solicitation, invitation or recommendation to subscribe for any AXA investment service or product and is provided to you for information purposes only. The views expressed do not constitute investment advice and do not necessarily represent the views of any company within the AXA Investment Managers Group and may be subject to change without notice. No representation or warranty (including liability towards third parties), express or implied, is made as to the accuracy, reliability or completeness of the information contained herein.
 
Past performance is not a guide to future performance. The value of investments and the income from them can fluctuate and investors may not get back the amount originally invested. Investments in newer markets and smaller companies offer the possibility of higher returns but may also involve a higher degree of risk.
 
Issued in the UK by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the U.K. Registered in England and Wales, No: 01431068. Registered Office: 22 Bishopsgate, London, EC2N 4BQ.
Telephone calls may be recorded or monitored for quality. 

AXA IM réalise sa première transaction de marché basée sur la technologie blockchain avec la Société Générale

AXA Investment Managers (AXA IM), en collaboration avec Société Générale-Forge, annonce avoir réalisé sa première transaction de marché basée sur l’infrastructure blockchain.

A travers sa plateforme obligataire, AXA IM a acheté auprès de la Société Générale trois millions d’euros d’obligations « unsecured » émises par la Banque Européenne d’Investissement (BEI) sous forme de « security tokens » sur la blockchain publique Ethereum, pour le compte d’AXA France.

Laurence Arnold, Head of Innovation Management and Strategic Initiatives d’AXA IM, a commenté : « La blockchain a la capacité de modifier significativement les processus de la gestion d’actifs, une partie ou l’ensemble de la chaîne de valeur pouvant bénéficier de cette technologie sur le long terme. Nous pensons qu’elle peut nous permettre d’améliorer l’expérience client en accélerant le traitement des transactions financières et en facilitant l’échange et le stockage des données.

Cette transaction s’inscrit au sein de notre démarche d’innovation, afin de réaliser de nouvelles expérimentations dans un écosystème en mutation permanente, découvrir de nouvelles techniques et de nouveaux marchés dans la perspective de toujours mieux servir nos clients et leur partager nos connaissances . »

Contacts

Hélène Caillet

+33 1 44 45 88 06

helene.caillet@axa-im.com

Julie Marie

+33 1 44 45 50 62

julie.marie@axa-im.com

Alexis Doublet

+33 1 44 45 84 03

alexis.doublet@axa-im.com

Servane Taslé

+33 6 66 58 84 28

servane@steeleandholt.com

À propos d’AXA Investment Managers

AXA Investment Managers (AXA IM) est un gestionnaire d’actifs responsable qui investit activement sur le long terme pour la prospérité de ses clients, de ses collaborateurs et de la planète.

Avec environ 879 milliards d’euros d’actifs sous gestion à fin septembre 2021, notre gestion de conviction nous permet d’identifier les opportunités d’investissement que nous considérons comme les meilleures du marché à l’échelle mondiale dans les différentes classes d’actifs alternatives et traditionnelles.

AXA IM est un leader sur le marché de l’investissement vert, social et durable, avec 577 milliards d’euros d’actifs intégrant des critères ESG, durables ou à impact, à fin septembre 2021.

Nous nous sommes engagés à atteindre l’objectif de zéro émission nette de gaz à effet de serre d’ici 2050 pour l’ensemble de nos actifs, et à intégrer les considérations ESG dans nos activités, de la sélection des titres à notre culture d’entreprise en passant par la façon dont nous gérons nos opérations au quotidien. Nous souhaitons apporter de la valeur à nos clients grâce à des solutions d’investissement responsables, tout en suscitant des changements significatifs pour la société et l’environnement.

A fin juin 2021, AXA IM emploie plus de 2 488 collaborateurs dans le monde, répartis dans 26 bureaux et 20 pays. AXA IM fait partie du Groupe AXA, un leader mondial de l’assurance et de la gestion d’actifs.

Consultez notre site internet : www.axa-im.com

Suivez-nous sur Twitter @AXAIM et @AXAIM_FR

Suivez-nous sur LinkedIn

Visitez notre espace presse : www.axa-im.com/fr/media-centre

Publié par AXA Investment Managers Paris – Tour Majunga – 6, place de la Pyramide – 92908 Paris La Défense cedex. Société de gestion de portefeuille titulaire de l’agrément AMF N° GP 92-08 en date du 7 avril 1992. S.A. au capital de 1 384 380 euros immatriculée au registre du commerce et des sociétés de Nanterre sous le numéro 353 534 506.

Ce communiqué de presse ne doit pas être considéré comme une offre, une sollicitation, une invitation ou une recommandation à souscrire un service ou produit d’investissement et est fourni à titre d’information uniquement. Aucune décision financière ne doit être effectuée sur la base des informations fournies. Ce communiqué de Presse est émis à la date indiquée. Il ne constitue pas une publicité financière telle que définie par le droit français. Il est émis dans un but d’information. Les performances passées ne sauraient préjuger des résultats futurs. Les opinions exprimées ne constituent pas un conseil en investissement, ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de l’une des sociétés du Groupe AXA Investment Managers et sont susceptibles de changer sans préavis.  Nous ne faisons aucune déclaration ni n’offrons aucune garantie explicite ou implicite (y compris à l’égard de tiers) quant à l’exactitude, la fiabilité ou l’exhaustivité des informations contenues dans ce document. Toute mention de stratégie n'est pas destinée à être promotionnelle et n'indique pas la disponibilité d'un véhicule d'investissement.

Vues d’Iggo

Mind the gap

The gap between realised inflation and the contemporaneous level of bond yields has never been higher. Bond markets might be telling us not to worry about inflation, it’s all transitory. But even if inflation settles lower, consistent with central bank targets, bond yields are *arguably* still low. A gradual withdrawal from bond buying might be what is needed to get yields higher. A 2.5% 10-year US Treasury yield is not out of the question should the Fed taper (as they will) and raise rates (as they will) in 2022. But we should consider what the consequences of inflation being higher for longer might be. 

Higher yields…

There are good reasons why bond yields should be higher. The fact that they aren’t deserves some consideration in order to weigh up whether portfolios need to be adjusted to protect against higher yields and the potential that could have for risk premiums in credit and equities. The 6.2% increase in US consumer price inflation in October was at the 88th percentile of all year-over-year rates of change since 1953 yet bond yields are only at the 2nd percentile and the effective Fed Fund rate is even lower. The break-down between contemporaneous inflation and interest rates is similar in the Euro Area and in the UK. Historical relationships point to bond yields being higher and monetary policy being tighter. At all other times since the 1950s that US consumer prices have risen by more than 6% in a 12-month period, 10-year Treasury bond yields have been above 7% at the same time. See the chart below, the blue dot at the bottom of the 6%-7% range is where we are today in the US. Of course, the world is different today to how it has been in the past, but there is a fundamental relationship between long-term interest rates and inflation that has broken down over the last decade and is now at an extreme misalignment.

 

    …maybe

It’s one thing saying where bond yields should be and quite another understanding why they are not. Successful investors don’t just bark “policy mistake” at central bankers but try and guess what the parameters of the reaction function are and, importantly, how other investors react to any changes. What squares the circle between where inflation is, and the current level of nominal bond yields is deeply negative real yields. The current market measure of 10-year real yields from the US TIPS market is -0.96%. The ex-post US real yield (nominal yields a year ago relative to realised inflation) was -5.5% in October. What investors need a view on is why real yields are negative. And of course, this is not just a US phenomenon – German real yields are -1.9% (the inflation linked German government bond maturing in 2033) and UK real yields for the 10-year inflation-linked gilt are -3.1%.

Freedom from repression!

I’ve written about this before. There are few empirically strong theories for why real yields are so low. It might be just because of quantitative easing which central banks resorted to in the absence of the ability to take short-term rates deep into negative territory. If central bank reaction functions are about to be re-calibrated to higher inflation and asset purchases come to an end, then short-rates and real-long term rates might move up. This surely is the playbook for bond bears. Central bank financial repression has pushed bond yields down to fundamentally mis-priced levels, so if you take away the financial repression, yields rise. And inflation is the macro reason we don’t need financial repression anymore.

Technical factors

With my fixed income colleagues I have been looking at market developments through the framework of considering macro, valuation, sentiment and technical factors for well over 10-years now. Increasingly, “technical” have dominated movements in yields and spreads, often contrary to the macro signals. But they are hard to measure. In practical terms it’s about trying to understand the supply and demand for fixed income assets that have more persistent influences on prices than just reactions to economic data releases or comments from central bankers. The biggest “technical” of them all in recent years has been central bank buying. Realistically, that has to stop before we see global real and nominal yields higher.

Of course, bond yields might be low simply because – collectively – investors don’t think the current increase in inflation can persist beyond the next few quarters. Implicit in that is an expectation of limited monetary tightening and the world being far away from the complete removal of financial repression. Today’s news about a new COVID variant has created a sharpy risk-off move in anticipation of potential further disruptions to global trade and activity. It’s too early to judge, according to scientists, whether the new variant detected in southern Africa will be able to evade current vaccines, but clearly this is the risk. A new wave of lockdowns and falling activity would clearly push bond yields LOWER and delay the reckoning discussed in the rest of this note.

New equilibrium?

But what if? What about a scenario in which inflation does moderate over the next year and settles – in the case of the US – in the 2%-3% range. For Europe that would be closer to the 2% than the 3% level. Historically, inflation in that range has been associated with yields (10-year Treasuries in this case) anywhere between just under 2% to 8%. Since the 1950s, when US CPI inflation was in that 2%-3% range, the average bond yield was 2.5%. Funnily enough, that is where the Fed’s current estimate of the long-term neutral Fed Funds rate is. Yields at 2.5% over the next year would not be out-of-whack with fundamentals. Unless the technical forces are stronger than we think, investors should be prepared for that.

Active protection

The first investment implication is that fixed income portfolios need to be managed actively. A 100bp increase in 10-year yields would mean a negative price adjustment of roughly 9% on the current benchmark bond. Yields aren’t likely to move higher in a straight line, however, and actively managing duration, yield curves, inflation and cross-market spreads can deliver much better returns when markets are going through a valuation adjustment. Any such adjustment is likely to be more muted in European government bonds as the ECB will remain a buyer for some time, while there is likely to be more total return volatility in the UK gilt market given the longer-duration of the market indices, the unpredictability of the Bank of England and the likely worse inflation/growth trade-off in the UK relative to other major economies.

Sound credit

Higher risk-free yields and less central bank liquidity is likely to impact on credit spreads as well. Risk premiums should rise. However, the historical pattern is not clear. In the US the Fed tightened in 2004-2006 but investment grade spreads actually went lower. In 2015-2018, spreads rose in anticipation of Fed tightening but peaked within weeks of the first hike – and there were eight more hikes ahead. Spreads fell through that period. The bottom-line is that credit spreads only really widen when there is a growth or other systemic shock. At the moment, fundamentals remain good for most credit asset classes. It would be only if markets got very concerned about growth would credit suffer noticeably.

Stocks and higher rates

If yields rise, what does it do for equities. When Treasury yields rose to 3.15% in December 2018, the S&P500 was trading on a price-earnings ratio of 15.5x. Thus, the earnings yield gap was 3.3%. Today it is around 3%. Assume an earnings yield gap of 3% and a bond yield of 2.5%, that translates to a PE of 18.2x. On the basis of the current 12-month forward forecast for EPS of $217, that delivers a price target for the S&P of 3950 – 15% lower than today’s index level. But, like for credit, growth is the real driver of equities and investors might be happy with a lower earnings yield gap – they have been in the past.

Earnings remain key

Equities face the headwinds of higher inflation, higher discount rates and a worsening relative valuation. Historically, equity multiples have fallen as inflation has moved higher and the 1%-3% range of inflation has been seen the market attach the highest multiples to earnings. Of course, higher inflation in the past was associated with higher bond and higher earnings yields. Low yields and strong earnings growth support equity returns for now. Having said that, investors might want to be tilted towards quality growth. I would think that energy comes off the boil next year, financials may still derive some support from the modest steepness in the yield curve, but cyclicals may struggle to maintain profit margins if cost increases persist. The green investment theme will also be a driver especially as the economics move irreversibly in favour of more sustainable business models.

 

Look to Asia

 Other themes that could be interesting would be a rebound in Chinese and Asian markets. China’s growth slowdown is well known now, and the drama of the Common Prosperity announcements has passed. There are still issues with the property sector and that could have broader economic consequences – construction materials, labour, home furnishing and white goods demand. Onshore Chinese equities have performed better than the H-shares listed in Hong Kong but have still only delivered a total return to date of 6.3% (Shanghai Composite to 23-11-2021) compared to 23.6% for the MSCI World index. Domestic support for Chinese brands, investment in the green infrastructure and broad policy support could be key drivers of this market. By the same token, on the fixed income side the Asian High Yield market could be interesting after a torrid year. Total returns have been negative (according to the JP Morgan JACI Corporate Diversified High Yield index) and the current yield is 7.7%. Yields that high in the past have generally meant decent total returns over the subsequent six months. Of course, it’s highly leveraged credit so selection is important in a market that has seen lots of bonds in distress recently. But there is a good chance the market will re-price to better levels.

It’s Carrick you know

Well the inevitable happened and Manchester United now have their sixth manager since Sir Alex Ferguson retired. I hope Michael Carrick can bring about the decisiveness he showed in the game against Villareal to upcoming Premier League games. The quality of the United players has never been in doubt but there have been issues with organisation and tactics, which have resulted in performances lacking cohesion and ambition. A team with Rashford, Ronaldo and Sancho in the attack should be doing better than eighth in the league table. More clean sheets and attacking pace please!


This communication is intended for professional clients only and should not be viewed by or used with retail clients. Circulation must be restricted accordingly.
 
Information relating to investments may have been based on research and analysis undertaken or procured by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited for its own purposes and may have been made available to other members of the AXA Investment Managers Group who in turn may have acted upon it. This material should not be regarded as an offer, solicitation, invitation or recommendation to subscribe for any AXA investment service or product and is provided to you for information purposes only. The views expressed do not constitute investment advice and do not necessarily represent the views of any company within the AXA Investment Managers Group and may be subject to change without notice. No representation or warranty (including liability towards third parties), express or implied, is made as to the accuracy, reliability or completeness of the information contained herein.
 
Past performance is not a guide to future performance. The value of investments and the income from them can fluctuate and investors may not get back the amount originally invested. Investments in newer markets and smaller companies offer the possibility of higher returns but may also involve a higher degree of risk.
 
Issued in the UK by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the U.K. Registered in England and Wales, No: 01431068. Registered Office: 22 Bishopsgate, London, EC2N 4BQ.
Telephone calls may be recorded or monitored for quality. 

Vues d’Iggo

Six and out?

Inflation dominates the investment backdrop but we have been reminded this week that COVID can still play a role in how the macro outlook unfolds. Higher rate expectations have been driven by inflation yet there is perhaps no strong reason to think central banks will need to do more than is already priced in. For investors, fixed income is likely to continue to deliver negative real returns unless exposures are successfully actively managed and include some inflation protection. For equities, demand, pricing power, and limits to how high long-term yields go are all positives. 

Preparing for higher rates in in 2022

The default investment strategy for 2022 has to involve accounting for interest rates potentially being increased in the UK and in the US. This is already priced in given the much higher than expected current and expected trajectory of inflation. There is no justification for central banks keeping interest rates at pandemic-crisis levels. The world is a long way through the pandemic and the global economy is operating at much higher levels of activity than it was when policy was dramatically eased in early 2020.  One could take the view that markets have already adjusted, bond yields think that the monetary tightening that is priced in will be enough to bring inflation down over the medium-term and equity markets don’t think the tightening that is priced in is dramatic enough to derail a bull market driven by super strong nominal GDP and earnings growth. If that view is correct, let the central banks crack on. Indeed, if we are about to experience another COVID-related shock to economic activity, it may be that too much has been priced in.

Inflation globally higher

The driver of higher rate expectation has been inflation. In the United States, the year-on-year change in consumer prices broke above 2.0% in February of this year and has been rising since. The average monthly increase in the consumer price index in 2021 has been just shy of 0.6% compared to just under 0.2% in 2019. Inflation rates are higher everywhere. In its October 2021 World Economic Outlook, the IMF projected consumer price inflation at 2.8% for advanced economies this year with developing economies expected to register 5.5%. Those averages disguise some eye-popping inflation forecasts in individual countries – Turkey at 14.6% this year and 16.7% in 2022 stands out. As a region, Latin America is expected to see close to 10% inflation next year while economies in Africa and the Middle East are already experiences double digit price increases.

But expected to ease in 2022/2023

In common with the consensus, however, the IMF projects an easing of inflation through 2022 and into 2023.  So does the bond market. I will repeat that the inflation-linked bond market continues to price distant inflation rates lower than near-term inflation rates. The break-even curves are inverted in the US and the UK. Short-term interest rate expectations have moved higher in recent months as inflation has smashed forward guidance, but long-term bond yields have been contained in an 80bps trading range (US Treasury 10-year) and are currently below the highs for the year. German bund yields have been in a 60bps range in 2021 and with the ECB the least likely of all major central banks (along with the Bank of Japan) to raise interest rates, long-term yields remain negative in the Euro area.

Assets and inflation

Investors need to have a view on two things for 2022. The first is what will be the evolution of inflation and the second is how to protect portfolios should inflation remain elevated, as it looks as though it will for a while. So far, fixed income assets have not done a very good job of protecting portfolio values from the rise in prices we have already seen. In the US the consumer price index is up 5.7% since December. A standard US Treasury index has registered a total return of -2.8% to date. An investment grade corporate bond index is down 1.3%. In the Euro area, consumer prices (all items) are up 4.1%, but total returns from a European government bond index, year-to-date, are -2.2% and from a standard corporate bond index in Europe, -0.5%. Real returns have been negative in high quality bond markets. They are likely to remain that way.

Inflation linked

The exception has been inflation-linked bonds. The total return on full market inflation linked bond indices in the US, UK and Euro Area has beaten inflation this year (6.4%, 7.6% and 6.8% respectively). Within fixed income this sector is likely to remain the best place to be and the shorter-duration strategies are most attractive in what I believe is the most likely scenario for inflation. At times there will be opportunities to buy government bonds but more from a tactical point of view. The net change in yields is likely to be positive over the next twelve months but history tells us this won’t be in a straight line. Limited supply and strong demand from duration hungry institutional investors will deliver periods where yields actually fall. If there is any sign that growth is starting to falter – perhaps because of COVID shutdowns - this will be an additional trigger to periods of better bond returns. Actively managing fixed income rather than a passive exposure to a bond index is the preferred bond strategy.

Credit rates below likely inflation

Corporate assets are still likely to be supported by positive fundamentals. Credit assets have not so far compensated for inflation and will struggle to do so in the first half of 2022. Spreads remain fairly tight and total returns are at risk from underlying yields moving higher, especially in the higher quality parts of the credit market. In emerging markets, much will depend on how policy makers deal with their own inflation problems, which tend to be higher because of the higher weighting of food and energy in inflation indices. Higher interest rates will undercut local currency returns, especially with a rampant dollar.

Earnings have been super-charged despite higher inflation

I often wonder if those that talk so negatively about bonds, inflation and central bank policy have any equities in their portfolios. Equities have generally outperformed inflation by a long margin for many years and this year has been no different. The total return from the MSCI World Index has been 25%. The combination of the strong recovery in final demand and increased investment, the push towards greater sustainability in many sectors and the greater fluidity in prices that has allowed many companies to exploit pricing power have all super-charged earnings. Strong earnings, low interest rates and accommodative policy settings have made it an easy decision to be mostly exposed to equities. The more effective vaccine roll-outs in developed economies has also contributed to a better performance of developed versus emerging equity markets.

Still positive for equities

The next year might not be quite as easy. Earnings growth will slow but overall demand should remain healthy. Policy will become a little less accommodative. Some margin compression may be seen if it becomes harder to pass on cost increases. However, on balance equity returns are likely to be superior to fixed income under the scenario that inflation remains elevated before easing back in the second half of the year.

Transitory for longer

The investment outlook depends on inflation. The global economy continues to be stressed by the relative strength of demand against a constrained aggregate supply curve. COVID is still impacting on supply chains and it is taking companies longer than expected to reduce order backlogs and deal with distribution logistics. The hope is that these tensions ease in 2022 with above trend demand for goods and below trend demand for services re-balancing going forward. However, high energy and food prices and evidence from many countries that real estate prices are rising rapidly are causes for concern. The real concern is what happens to wages and inflationary expectations. It’s a stretch to argue that a wage-price spiral of yesteryear will re-emerge. It’s not in the DNA of companies to sanction inflation-busting wage increases year-after-year. By the same token, fiscal largesse is unlikely to be permanent. The risk scenario for investors is that we go through an amplified but shortened business cycle – inflation is higher, monetary policy is tightened by even more than is priced in and, given debt levels, growth collapses into the next deflationary downturn. That is a much harder macro-environment to trade. If bond yields rise further, having some long-duration exposure at some point would at least help.

Six and out?

When the Federal Reserve (Fed) last undertook a monetary tightening cycle it started off, in 2015, with a view that the terminal Fed Funds rate would be 3.5%. By the time the Fed has finished tightening the terminal rate estimate was 3.0%. Now the best estimate is 2.5%. In 2018 the Fed stopped raising rates 50 bps below what had then become its terminal rate forecast. Using the same logic, on the fundamental assumption that it takes less in terms of rate hikes to slow the economy, then we are perhaps looking at a 2.0% potential peak in Fed Funds. The market has not quite priced that in yet but is close to doing so. Nearly six hikes are priced in – the Fed did nine in 2015-2018. Thus the path of monetary normalisation might not be that bad. The alternative scenario is one in which a massive policy mistake is made and the long-run neutral rate of interest is much higher, meaning a far more aggressive tightening cycle. So far, there is no evidence to suggest that this is likely to become the dominant scenario any time soon.

Nerves

It’s the weekend after the international break and that can only mean one thing for me – more Manchester United angst. If Ole is to survive, the Reds have to beat Watford in style and then make sure of Champions League qualification next week. Even that might not be enough if rumours of dressing room unrest are to be believed. I’d take Luis Enrique or Zizou but my hope is that the current management can turn things around. We are only nine points behind Chelsea with still 28 games to play. Could be worse, could be Leeds.

This communication is intended for professional clients only and should not be viewed by or used with retail clients. Circulation must be restricted accordingly.
 
Information relating to investments may have been based on research and analysis undertaken or procured by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited for its own purposes and may have been made available to other members of the AXA Investment Managers Group who in turn may have acted upon it. This material should not be regarded as an offer, solicitation, invitation or recommendation to subscribe for any AXA investment service or product and is provided to you for information purposes only. The views expressed do not constitute investment advice and do not necessarily represent the views of any company within the AXA Investment Managers Group and may be subject to change without notice. No representation or warranty (including liability towards third parties), express or implied, is made as to the accuracy, reliability or completeness of the information contained herein.
 
Past performance is not a guide to future performance. The value of investments and the income from them can fluctuate and investors may not get back the amount originally invested. Investments in newer markets and smaller companies offer the possibility of higher returns but may also involve a higher degree of risk.
 
Issued in the UK by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the U.K. Registered in England and Wales, No: 01431068. Registered Office: 22 Bishopsgate, London, EC2N 4BQ.
Telephone calls may be recorded or monitored for quality. 

Vues d’Iggo

Everything’s going green

The world is probably not on track yet to preventing global temperatures rising by more than 1.5oC above pre-industrial levels. Despite all the pledges made at COP26 we are likely going to be faced with more frequent extreme weather events and their consequences for businesses and communities. So, pressure will remain on policy makers to do more. For investors, the good news is that we are mobilising finance to help the transition and companies are developing more sustainable technologies. We are definitely moving towards a greener economy and that brings with it tremendous investment opportunities. 

Blah, blah or hurrah, hurrah?  

Judging the success or otherwise of COP26 depends on the answer to one simple question: will it contribute to humanity successfully reducing net carbon emissions to zero and stopping the global atmospheric temperature rising by more than 1.5oC by 2050? Clearly we can’t answer that today so we have to rely on judgement and scientific analysis to decide whether we think that a) pledges made by world leaders in Glasgow are sufficient and will be implemented and b) whether what has been pledged and what will be implemented will result in that 2050 target.

Small degrees

On the optimistic side some research suggests that the global temperatures will peak at 1.9o C this century. A report by Climate Resource cites University of Melbourne research based on pledges made by countries immediately ahead of COP26. Assuming pledges are implemented (including those updated Nationally Determined Contributions from India and China) then there is a 50% chance of us coming in below 2o C. This compares with the estimate of 2.7o C estimated by the UN Environment Programme based on pledges made up to a few weeks ago. Potentially some good news then. 

Eyes on the big four

Optimists would also take heart from the agreements reached on deforestation, plans to reduce methane emissions and commitments to phase out coal. Towards the end of COP26 it was announced that the US and China would work together to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. They need to. Those two countries are the biggest emitters, followed by India and Russia. Indeed, the gloss may be taken off any optimism by the realisation that none of the big four have committed to net zero by 2050 nor have signed the agreement to phase out coal. We can only hope that intermediate targets and co-operation will result in significant declines in emissions in the short term and over the whole period to the second half of the century. As yet though, the intermediate targets are not convincing and more formal commitments to reducing emissions this decade have yet to be agreed on.

Political constraints can’t be ignored

On the whole, I would say there has been modest progress but not enough to be confident about meeting the Paris targets. It’s easy to see why activists are sceptical about official pledges and there is a sense that leaders of the biggest countries lack ambition and are hindered by domestic political considerations, powerful vested interests, and geo-security concerns. Can we really be sure that the current political leadership in Brazil will stop deforestation of the Amazon given the importance of cattle rearing and soya production to the Brazilian economy? Can we be sure that the US will reverse on its commitments should there be another significant political swing at the 2024 election? If we are to focus on one thing, there has not been enough concrete action to reduce coal usage in the biggest consumers of that fuel source.

Good things

I attended the World Climate Summit (Investment COP) in Glasgow with some of my colleagues. One thing we can be sure of is that the private sector is doing a lot. Under pressure from their investors and their customers, companies across a range of sectors are developing new technologies and shifting their operating models to be on a pathway to net zero. There were discussions about the falling costs of offshore wind. I saw a company present technology that used recycled textiles and wood pulp to manufacture new textiles for the clothing industry (apparently only 1% of textiles are recycled currently – most end up in landfill or on stalls at Camden Market!). Technology is advancing everywhere and that means lower carbon production is becoming cheaper.

Opportunities

The private sector can’t do it all and there is far to go. There were consistent calls for clearer policies and regulations, for governments to use taxes and subsidies more effectively and for joined up plans and financing to deliver the infrastructure necessary to rapidly shift to a low carbon economy. The mobilisation of green finance will be important in all of this and there are increasingly larger amounts of capital controlled by asset owners, asset managers and banks that are looking to be invested in a net zero way. As I’ve written many times, this means huge investment opportunities in climate leaders that are developing the technological solutions to climate change and those companies that are leading the transition to a lower carbon business model. Some of that means exposure to the regime changing technologies – electric vehicles, batteries, renewable energy, hydrogen and so on. But it also means using ESG techniques to identify companies that are making changes to what they do today to reduce their carbon footprint. A footwear manufacturer said it changed the size of its shoe boxes to optimise the space that shipments would take in containers. Using less space means losing less CO2. Things like that will be (or should be) picked up in an ESG assessment, allowing companies to attract capital from investors focussed on sustainability.

What price carbon?

There have been widespread calls from the private sector for world leaders to agree on a system of carbon pricing. I heard many at the WCS and I watched online a COP associated session on innovation focussing on hydrogen where all the speakers called for a carbon price. At the time of writing there was no agreement. It is crucial there is though. Carbon pricing – in the form of taxes on carbon emissions or delivered through a cap-and-trade emissions trading system –internalises the external costs from emitting CO2. That means a fossil fuel using power generator would need to incorporate the cost of carbon to its cost base. It would suffer lower profit margins or pass on the cost to its customers – either way making the business less attractive. Higher costs for fossil fuels through the incorporation of carbon pricing would shift the relative cost comparison in favour of more renewable alternatives. This is true not just in energy but in range of sectors. However, overtime it would be most impactful in the hardest to abate areas like steel production and long-distance transportation. As fossil-fuel based processes rise in price, technology is driving down the cost of alternatives and this will contribute massively to decarbonisation in the real economy.

Costly transition

Another thing that was clear from the discussions is that the transition is costly in terms of the amount of investment needed. It could also be costly in that it leads to higher prices for some goods and services, especially if policy actions are taken to shift relative pricing before competitive markets have evolved sufficiently on the renewable or low carbon side. I received a piece of research this week that made the link between capital being channelled away from high emitters, forcing up the cost of capital and contributing to lower replacement capital spending. That means capacity gets constrained in those sectors and the current problems with energy might be a clear example of that. Politics has not even started to address the cost on low income households and countries – electric cars, domestic heating, basic transport and housing needs in emerging countries. There is a huge social cost to be addressed and it needs to be unless we are willing to countenance the much bigger economic and human costs of rising above 2oC.

Inflation

Markets are concerned about inflation and rightly so in the wake of the 6.2% year over year gain in US consumer prices for October. In the last almost 40 years, US inflation has only been above 5% on three occasions, including now. After the previous two it fell back sharply, and I’m not convinced that our economies have reverted to the institutional structure that sustained higher rates of inflation before the early 1980s. Yet supply problems, base effects and strong demand could be compounded by price effects related to the structural shifts towards low carbon. Needless to say, markets will keep pushing this narrative until central banks start raising interest rates and that looks increasingly like being the key focus in 2022.

This communication is intended for professional clients only and should not be viewed by or used with retail clients. Circulation must be restricted accordingly.
 
Information relating to investments may have been based on research and analysis undertaken or procured by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited for its own purposes and may have been made available to other members of the AXA Investment Managers Group who in turn may have acted upon it. This material should not be regarded as an offer, solicitation, invitation or recommendation to subscribe for any AXA investment service or product and is provided to you for information purposes only. The views expressed do not constitute investment advice and do not necessarily represent the views of any company within the AXA Investment Managers Group and may be subject to change without notice. No representation or warranty (including liability towards third parties), express or implied, is made as to the accuracy, reliability or completeness of the information contained herein.
 
Past performance is not a guide to future performance. The value of investments and the income from them can fluctuate and investors may not get back the amount originally invested. Changes in exchange rates will affect the value of investments made overseas. Investments in newer markets and smaller companies offer the possibility of higher returns but may also involve a higher degree of risk.
 
Issued in the UK by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the U.K. Registered in England and Wales, No: 01431068. Registered Office: 22 Bishopsgate, London, EC2N 4BQ.
Telephone calls may be recorded or monitored for quality. 

AXA IM continue à renforcer ses actions en faveur du climat pour accélérer sa contribution vers un monde bas carbone

  • AXA IM renforce sa politique d'engagement et d’actionnariat actif climatique afin de se désengager des « climate laggards ».
  • Mise en place d’une politique d'investissement renforcée pour le secteur du pétrole et du gaz avec de nouvelles exclusions, afin d’atténuer les impacts négatifs de cette industrie sur l'environnement.
  • Orientation volontaire de capital vers des solutions climatiques favorisant la transition vers des stratégies plus durables pour devenir un investisseur et une entreprise net zéro à l’horizon 2050.

AXA Investment Managers (AXA IM) annonce aujourd'hui le renforcement de ses engagements climatiques visant à accélérer sa contribution à la transition vers un monde plus durable et moins carboné.

« Nous avons tous un rôle à jouer dans la transition vers un monde bas carbone et nous sommes fiers d'annoncer nos nouveaux engagements pour le climat à l’occasion du Sommet mondial sur le climat (World Climate Summit, the Invesment COP). Nous sommes un gérant actif et la façon dont nous mettons nos convictions en action et allouons le capital a le pouvoir d’influencer le comportement des entreprises dans lesquelles nous investissons. Notre devoir fiduciaire va au-delà du rendement fourni à nos clients. Nous devons également investir de manière responsable et agir de manière déterminée pour lutter contre le changement climatique. C'est ainsi qu'AXA IM contribue à ce défi mondial. Dans nos choix d'investissement, dans les produits que nous proposons, dans la manière dont nous engageons et votons, et dans la façon dont nous gérons nos propres opérations : nous agissons pour favoriser un équilibre entre rendement et durabilité du monde dans lequel nous vivons », a commenté Marco Morelli, Executive Chairman d’AXA IM.

Une politique d’engagement climatique renforcée

« Nous croyons que nous devons allouer encore plus de capitaux aux solutions climatiques et aux actifs alignés sur une trajectoire net zéro tout en continuant à financer des entreprises qui, selon nous, sont véritablement engagées dans la transition. L'engagement et un dialogue ouvert avec les entreprises et nos clients sont essentiels pour comprendre et influencer les trajectoires net zéro. Mais si nous ne voyons pas de progrès et d'engagements forts de la part des entreprises, nous devons faire preuve de courage et d’audace dans nos décisions d'investissement et être prêts à désinvestir. La chemin vers un monde net zéro est avant tout une question de transition. Nous devons donner aux entreprises le temps de s'adapter mais nous devons également adopter une approche sans compromis avec celles qui ne prennent pas le changement climatique au sérieux », a ajouté Marco Morelli.

Dès 2022, AXA IM intégrera encore davantage l’angle climatique dans ses décisions d'investissement et adoptera quatre approches différentes avec les entreprises et les émetteurs ayant un impact important sur le climat, en fonction de leur catégorie :

  • Les « climate leaders » (les leaders climatiques) sont des entreprises qui fournissent des solutions climatiques permettant la transition vers un monde à 1,5°C et/ou qui ont déjà une faible empreinte carbone et les meilleures pratiques climatiques et environnementales de leur secteur.

AXA IM continuera à investir dans ces « climate leaders » et veillera à ce qu'ils maintiennent leur leadership.

  • Les « transition leaders » (les leaders de la transition climatique) sont des entreprises ayant un bon historique de performance en matière de réduction des émissions de carbone et/ou une trajectoire d'amélioration bien définie avec des objectifs quantifiables.

AXA IM continuera son travail d’identification de ces « transition leaders » qui présentent une opportunité de croissance et offrent ainsi de la valeur à long terme pour les clients.

  • Les « transition laggards » (les retardataires de la transition climatique) sont des entreprises conscientes de l’enjeu climatique mais plus lentes à s'engager dans une transition concrète.

AXA IM continuera à investir dans ces « transition laggards » et à engager avec eux afin de les inciter à accélérer leur transition, notamment via nos votes en Assemblée Générale.

  • Les « climate laggards » (les retardataires de l’enjeu climatique) sont des entreprises qui ne prennent pas le changement climatique au sérieux selon AXA IM. AXA IM établira une liste composée de sociétés dont le poids est significatif dans ses portefeuilles et dont l'impact sur le climat est également élevé.

AXA IM engagera avec ces entreprises à partir de 2022 en définissant des objectifs clairs, suivra leurs actions jusqu'en 2025 et se désengagera si les progrès sur leur trajectoire net zéro ne sont pas probants, appliquant ainsi le principe « trois avertissements et vous sortez »three strikes and you’re out »). AXA IM cherchera à réinvestir le capital potentiellement désinvesti des « climate laggards » dans les « climate et transition leaders ».

Une politique d'investissement renforcée sur le secteur du pétrole et du gaz, avec de nouvelles exclusions

Afin d’atténuer les impacts négatifs de cette industrie sur l'environnement, AXA IM renforcera sa politique pétrole et gaz comme suit :

Nouvelles exclusions sur le pétrole et le gaz non conventionnels

  • Renforcement de la politique sur les sables bitumineux par l'ajout d'un seuil d'exclusion absolu conduisant à l'exclusion des sociétés pour lesquelles les sables bitumineux représentent plus de 5 % de leur production totale.
  • Extension du focus environnemental avec l'adoption d'une politique stricte sur l'Arctique en excluant les activités d'extraction de pétrole et de gaz menées dans la région du Programme de surveillance et d'évaluation de l'Arctique (Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme - AMAP). Cela impliquera le désinvestissement des entreprises qui tirent plus de 10 % de leur production de cette région. Concernant le schiste et la fracturation hydraulique (fracking), AXA IM exclura les petits acteurs dont la production est supérieure à 30 %.
  • Ces nouvelles restrictions font partie des standards ESG d'AXA IM et seront mises en œuvre début 2022.

Des activités d’engagement

  • AXA IM engagera avec les entreprises du pétrole et du gaz qui restent dans le périmètre d’investissement sur la base d'objectifs clairs et d'un calendrier précis, et désinvestira après trois ans si leurs progrès sont jugés insuffisants.
  • Le standard SBTi (Science-Based Targets initiative) pour le secteur du pétrole et du gaz devrait être publié d'ici la fin de l'année 2021, et AXA IM s'assurera que les acteurs du secteur restant dans le périmètre d’investissement établissent des objectifs scientifiques conformes à ce nouveau standard en temps voulu.

Une attention accrue sur le pétrole et le gaz non conventionnels et conventionnels

  • Une attention systématique sera portée aux pratiques opérationnelles afin de veiller à ce que la gestion du méthane soit correcte et que les indicateurs CO2 soient conformes aux attentes.

Investir dans des solutions climat pour favoriser la transition vers un monde à 1,5°C

Allouer des capitaux à des solutions respectueuses du climat pour favoriser la durabilité et la performance sur le long terme nécessite de la transparence sur l'intention et les objectifs des stratégies.

AXA IM a pris des engagements pour encourager l’orientation des capitaux vers ces solutions  :

  • Poursuivre le développement de la gamme de fonds ACT[1] (les fonds ESG les plus ciblés) pour simplifier son offre auprès des distributeurs et des investisseurs finaux. La gamme ACT comprend des fonds ESG intégrés récemment lancés qui ciblent des objectifs de développement durable spécifiques autour de questions telles que celle du changement climatique.
  • Veiller à ce qu'un plus grand nombre de fonds et de stratégies éligibles lancés au sein des plateformes Equity, Fixed Income et Multi-Asset – représentant la majorité des actifs gérés par AXA IM – relèvent des articles 8 et 9 du Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation (SFDR), la réglementation la plus stricte et exigeante de l'Union Européenne pour les fonds d'investissement durables.
  • Continuer à investir dans des actifs verts pour contribuer au financement de la transition vers un monde bas carbone. Les investissements verts, composés d’obligations à impact, d'actions cotées vertes et d'actifs réels verts représentaient plus de 32,7 milliards d'euros d’actifs sous gestion à fin juin 2021.
  • Réduire de 20 % d’ici 2025 l’intensité des émissions de CO2 par mètre carré des actifs immobiliers directs sous gestion, par rapport à 2019, avec un objectif net zéro à horizon 2050.
  • Avoir 50 % d’actifs immobiliers directs sous gestion alignés avec la trajectoire 1,5° C d’ici 2025.

En outre, AXA IM, Blue Like an Orange et Proparco (filiale de l'Agence Française de Développement axée sur le développement du secteur privé) travaillent sur une stratégie d'investissement innovante pour mobiliser entre 1 et 2 milliards de dollars US auprès d'institutions financières de développement, de grands investisseurs privés et d’assureurs. Cette stratégie obligataire investirait dans des obligations des marchés émergents et viserait à soutenir les émetteurs dans le développement de projets renforçant les Objectifs de Développement Durable des Nations Unies (« ODD »).

Devenir une entreprise net zéro d'ici 2050

AXA IM a pris les mesures suivantes pour réduire sa propre empreinte carbone et devenir une entreprise net zéro d'ici 2050 :

  • mesurer la consommation et devenir neutre en carbone, grâce à l'identification de l'empreinte carbone actuelle et à la compensation.
  • Réduire la consommation pour tendre vers le net zéro avec l’objectif déjà affiché de réduire ses émissions de CO2 de 25 % d'ici 2025 par rapport à 2019.
  • Compenser les émissions restantes grâce à des solutions de compensation visant à éliminer le carbone, en tirant parti du savoir-faire de ClimateSeed.

De plus amples informations sur ces engagements seront communiquées en 2022.

AXA IM a mis en place les initiatives suivantes afin de contribuer à la transition vers un monde bas carbone :

  • Sortie de tous les investissements charbon dans les pays de l’OCDE d’ici à 2030 et dans le reste du monde d’ici à 2040[2].
  • Rendre sa gamme de produits plus « verte », incluant le lancement de nouvelles stratégies carbone, l’élargissement de son portefeuille d’investissements verts et la création de la gamme de fonds « ACT » pour catégoriser ses fonds ESG les plus ciblés et permettre aux clients de mieux les identifier grâce à des critères transparents.
  • 41 % des actifs éligibles d'AXA IM sont en voie d'atteindre l’objectif net zéro en 2050 au plus tard[3], avec la volonté de continuer à augmenter la proportion d'actifs sous gestion net zéro en 2022. D'ici 2030, l'empreinte CO2 de ces actifs devrait avoir diminué de 50 % par rapport à 2019.
  • Publication d’un rapport annuel Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) depuis 2019, présentant les stratégies ESG et climat ainsi que des données clés telles que l’empreinte carbone de ses investissements qui a été réduite de 8 % entre 2018 et 2020.
  • Engagement avec 319 entreprises en 2020, 27 % de ces initiatives portant sur la thématique du changement climatique et 18 % portant sur les ressources et les écosystèmes.
  • Collaboration avec AXA pour évaluer la méthodologie d’investissement alignée sur les accords de Paris et définition d’objectifs réalistes : en 2020, le Groupe AXA s’est engagé à réduire de 20 %, entre 2019 et 2025, les émissions carbones au sein des investissements éligibles. Cet objectif est revu régulièrement dans le cadre du protocole Net Zero Asset Owner Alliance (NZAOA) [4].
  • Le premier Prix AXA IM pour la transition climatique[5] a été décerné au Dr. Floor van der Hilst pour ses recherches sur la « Durabilité des bioénergies ». Elle a reçu 100 000 euros en reconnaissance de l'impact de ses travaux, qui portent sur la dynamique des changements d'affectation des sols résultant de la production de biomasse.

 

(1] « ACT » est une dénomination interne à AXA IM.

(2] Voir notre politique sur les risques climatiques : https://www.axa-im.com/sites/corporate/files/2021-08/20210226_AXA_IM_Climate_Risks_Policy_.pdf

(3] Voir : 90 % des actifs sous gestion d’AXA IM sont classifiés articles 8 et 9 selon la réglementation européenne SFDR - AXA IM France - Presse (axa-im.fr)

(4] Voir : https://www.unepfi.org/net-zero-alliance/about/

(5] Voir : https://presse.axa-im.fr/content/-/asset_publisher/zgi7EHNLfZcd/content/axa-im-et-le-fonds-axa-pour-la-recherche-annoncent-la-laur-c3-a9ate-du-prix-axa-im-pour-la-transition-climatique/24052

Contacts

Hélène Caillet

+33 1 44 45 88 06

helene.caillet@axa-im.com

Julie Marie

+33 1 44 45 50 62

julie.marie@axa-im.com

Alexis Doublet

+33 1 44 45 84 03

alexis.doublet@axa-im.com

Servane Taslé

+33 6 66 58 84 28

servane@steelandholt.com

À propos d’AXA Investment Managers

AXA Investment Managers (AXA IM) est un gestionnaire d’actifs responsable qui investit activement sur le long terme pour la prospérité de ses clients, de ses collaborateurs et de la planète.

Avec environ 879 milliards d’euros d’actifs sous gestion à fin septembre 2021, notre gestion de conviction nous permet d’identifier les opportunités d’investissement que nous considérons comme les meilleures du marché à l’échelle mondiale dans les différentes classes d’actifs alternatives et traditionnelles.

AXA IM est un leader sur le marché de l’investissement vert, social et durable, avec 568 milliards d’euros d’actifs intégrant des critères ESG, durables ou à impact, à fin juin 2021.

Nous nous sommes engagés à atteindre l’objectif de zéro émission nette de gaz à effet de serre d’ici 2050 pour l’ensemble de nos actifs, et à intégrer les considérations ESG dans nos activités, de la sélection des titres à notre culture d’entreprise en passant par la façon dont nous gérons nos opérations au quotidien. Nous souhaitons apporter de la valeur à nos clients grâce à des solutions d’investissement responsables, tout en suscitant des changements significatifs pour la société et l’environnement.

A fin juin 2021, AXA IM emploie plus de 2 488 collaborateurs dans le monde, répartis dans 26 bureaux et 20 pays. AXA IM fait partie du Groupe AXA, un leader mondial de l’assurance et de la gestion d’actifs.

Consultez notre site internet : www.axa-im.com

Suivez-nous sur Twitter @AXAIM et @AXAIM_FR

Suivez-nous sur LinkedIn

Visitez notre espace presse : www.axa-im.com/fr/media-centre

Publié par AXA Investment Managers Paris – Tour Majunga – La Défense 9 – 6, place de la Pyramide – 92800 Puteaux. Société de gestion de portefeuille titulaire de l’agrément AMF N° GP 92-08 en date du 7 avril 1992 S.A au capital de 1.421.906 euros immatriculée au registre du commerce et des sociétés de Nanterre sous le numéro 353 534 506.

Ce communiqué de presse ne doit pas être considéré comme une offre, une sollicitation, une invitation ou une recommandation à souscrire un service ou produit d’investissement et est fourni à titre d’information uniquement. Aucune décision financière ne doit être effectuée sur la base des informations fournies. Ce communiqué de Presse est émis à la date indiquée. Il ne constitue pas une publicité financière telle que définie par le droit français. Il est émis dans un but d’information. Les performances passées ne sauraient préjuger des résultats futurs. Les opinions exprimées ne constituent pas un conseil en investissement, ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de l’une des sociétés du Groupe AXA Investment Managers et sont susceptibles de changer sans préavis.  Nous ne faisons aucune déclaration ni n’offrons aucune garantie explicite ou implicite (y compris à l’égard de tiers) quant à l’exactitude, la fiabilité ou l’exhaustivité des informations contenues dans ce document. Toute mention de stratégie n'est pas destinée à être promotionnelle et n'indique pas la disponibilité d'un véhicule d'investissement.

AXA IM et le Fonds AXA pour la Recherche annoncent la lauréate du Prix AXA IM pour la Transition Climatique

AXA Investment Managers (AXA IM), en collaboration avec le Fonds AXA pour la Recherche, a lancé en septembre 2021 le Prix AXA IM pour la Transition Climatique, afin de reconnaître la contribution innovante de la recherche en matière de lutte contre le changement climatique.

À l'issue d'un rigoureux processus de sélection, le comité de sélection a le plaisir d'annoncer que le Dr Floor van der Hilst, de l’Université d’Utrecht (Pays-Bas), a reçu le Prix AXA IM pour la Transition Climatique pour ses recherches sur la « Durabilité des Bioénergies » et recevra 100 000 euros en reconnaissance de l'impact de ses travaux, qui portent sur la dynamique des changements d'affectation des sols résultant de la production de biomasse.

De nombreuses candidatures de chercheurs du monde entier ont été reçues, toutes axées sur la découverte des moyens les plus efficaces pour favoriser la transition climatique. Parmi les sujets abordés : la finance durable, le carbone bleu, la durabilité des bioénergies, l'architecture adaptée au climat, l'économie et la politique agricoles, l'adaptation des zones côtières grâce à des solutions naturelles, les défis urbains ou encore une nouvelle formule chimique pour créer des batteries.

Commentant les recherches de la lauréate, le comité de sélection a déclaré : « Nous avons examiné la liste des candidats avec la plus grande attention, en tenant compte de la solidité et de la qualité de leurs travaux scientifiques, de la pertinence du sujet traité dans le cadre du prix et de la capacité du chercheur à expliquer ses travaux de recherche. Le bénéfice potentiel pour la société était également un critère majeur. Les recherches du Dr van der Hilst étaient fortement axées sur les aspects socio-économiques et environnementaux, ce qui est essentiel pour obtenir le changement environnemental dont nous avons besoin. »

Marie Bogataj, Head of the AXA Research Fund and Group Foresight, et Marco Morelli, Executive Chairman d'AXA IM, ont commenté : « La recherche joue un rôle central dans la lutte contre le changement climatique et son impact sur notre société. Le soutien continu de la communauté scientifique - et envers ses membres - est incontournable pour permettre la transition vers un monde net zéro. La science est essentielle et continue de fournir un certain nombre de voies vers la transition climatique, mais il reste encore des domaines majeurs à explorer. Avec le Prix AXA IM pour la Transition Climatique, nous cherchons à combattre les risques liés au climat et à avoir un impact positif sur la société. Nous sommes très fiers de voir que ce prix aidera le Dr van der Hilst à poursuivre ses recherches au profit de la planète, des gens et des communautés. »

A propos de la lauréate   

  

Dr Floor van der Hilst

Professeure Associée à l'Institut Copernicus de Développement Durable de l'Université d'Utrecht, Pays-Bas.

Sujet de recherche : Durabilité des bioénergies

La recherche du Dr van der Hilst se concentre sur la dynamique des changements d'utilisation des terres résultant de la production de biomasse et des impacts qui y sont liés.

Afin de respecter l'accord de Paris et de maintenir l'augmentation de la température mondiale en-dessous de 2°C par rapport aux niveaux pré-industriels, la biomasse devrait jouer un rôle important dans l'approvisionnement énergétique futur. Cependant, le déploiement à grande échelle de la biomasse pour les bioénergies et autres nouvelles applications biosourcées a soulevé plusieurs problèmes de durabilité : le potentiel d'atténuation des gaz à effet de serre, l'impact sur la biodiversité, la qualité des sols et la disponibilité de l'eau ainsi que les impacts socio-économiques comme la sécurité alimentaire.

De nombreuses incidences sur le développement durable sont liées au changement d'affectation des sols résultant de la production de matières premières à base de biomasse. L'impact environnemental et socio-économique du changement d'affectation des sols induit par la production de bioénergie dépend fortement des conditions biophysiques et socio-économiques spatialement hétérogènes. Par conséquent, la durabilité de la production de bioénergies est grandement affectée par le lieu de production de ses matières premières. Pour ces raisons, il est difficile de faire des généralités sur la durabilité des bioénergies. L'incertitude quant à la durabilité des bioénergies entrave la mise en œuvre et, par conséquent, la réalisation des objectifs d'atténuation du changement climatique.

Pour plus d’informations sur le Dr Floor van der Hilst : https://www.uu.nl/staff/FvanderHilst

 

A propos du Prix AXA IM pour la Transition Climatique

Le prix vise à soutenir un chercheur avancé de niveau PhD + 8 ans à + 12 ans maximum qui aura démontré l’impact et le caractère innovant de sa recherche sur la transition climatique.

Les candidatures devaient être soumises avant le 6 octobre 2021.

Les domaines couverts  par ce prix étaient les suivants :

  • Des solutions et approches innovantes en matière d’atténuation pour atteindre l’objectif net zéro d’ici 2050.
  • Des solutions naturelles comme composantes clés de la transition climatique, tant en termes d’atténuation que d’adaptation, leur efficacité et leur capacité à coexister avec d’autres solutions.
  • La mesure et le suivi d’éléments comme point central du changement climatique, à la fois en termes d'évaluation de nos limites mais aussi de l'étendue des succès réalisés ou des échecs dans la réduction des niveaux de CO2 et autres polluants. Par exemple, la tarification du carbone ou des approches alternatives aux incitations financières et économiques aux réductions de CO2 (et autres gaz à effet de serre) et des méthodologies de mesure pour la réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre et l'élimination du CO2.
  • Au-delà du CO2, la diminution d’autres facteurs climatiques de courte durée pour contribuer à la réduction du réchauffement climatique.

Pour plus d’informations sur le Prix AXA IM pour la Transition Climatique : https://www.axa-im.com/climate-transition-award

Contacts

Hélène Caillet

+33 1 44 45 88 06

helene.caillet@axa-im.com

Julie Marie

+33 1 44 45 50 62

julie.marie@axa-im.com

Alexis Doublet

+33 1 44 45 84 03

alexis.doublet@axa-im.com

Servane Taslé

+33 6 66 58 84 28

servane@steelandholt.com

À propos d’AXA Investment Managers

AXA Investment Managers (AXA IM) est un gestionnaire d’actifs responsable qui investit activement sur le long terme pour la prospérité de ses clients, de ses collaborateurs et de la planète.

Avec environ 879 milliards d’euros d’actifs sous gestion à fin septembre 2021, notre gestion de conviction nous permet d’identifier les opportunités d’investissement que nous considérons comme les meilleures du marché à l’échelle mondiale dans les différentes classes d’actifs alternatives et traditionnelles.

AXA IM est un leader sur le marché de l’investissement vert, social et durable, avec 568 milliards d’euros d’actifs intégrant des critères ESG, durables ou à impact, à fin juin 2021.

Nous nous sommes engagés à atteindre l’objectif de zéro émission nette de gaz à effet de serre d’ici 2050 pour l’ensemble de nos actifs, et à intégrer les considérations ESG dans nos activités, de la sélection des titres à notre culture d’entreprise en passant par la façon dont nous gérons nos opérations au quotidien. Nous souhaitons apporter de la valeur à nos clients grâce à des solutions d’investissement responsables, tout en suscitant des changements significatifs pour la société et l’environnement.

A fin juin 2021, AXA IM emploie plus de 2 488 collaborateurs dans le monde, répartis dans 26 bureaux et 20 pays. AXA IM fait partie du Groupe AXA, un leader mondial de l’assurance et de la gestion d’actifs.

Consultez notre site internet : www.axa-im.com

Suivez-nous sur Twitter @AXAIM et @AXAIM_FR

Suivez-nous sur LinkedIn

Visitez notre espace presse : https://presse.axa-im.fr/

A propos du Fonds AXA pour la Recherche

Le Fonds AXA pour la Recherche a été lancé en 2008 pour répondre aux enjeux les plus importants auxquels notre planète est confrontée. Sa mission philanthropique est de soutenir la recherche scientifique dans des domaines clés liés au risque et d’aider à éclairer la prise de décisions fondées sur la science dans les secteurs public et privé.

Depuis son lancement, le Fonds AXA pour la Recherche a engagé un total de 250 M€ dans la philanthropie scientifique et soutenu 665 projets de recherche dans les domaines de la Santé, du Climat et de l’Environnement et de la Socio-économie.

ar AXA Investment Managers Paris – Tour Majunga – 6, place de la Pyramide – 92908 Paris La Défense cedex. Société de gestion de portefeuille titulaire de l’agrément AMF N° GP 92-08 en date du 7 avril 1992. S.A. au capital de 1 384 380 euros immatriculée au registre du commerce et des sociétés de Nanterre sous le numéro 353 534 506.

Ce communiqué de presse ne doit pas être considéré comme une offre, une sollicitation, une invitation ou une recommandation à souscrire un service ou produit d’investissement et est fourni à titre d’information uniquement. Aucune décision financière ne doit être effectuée sur la base des informations fournies. Ce communiqué de Presse est émis à la date indiquée. Il ne constitue pas une publicité financière telle que définie par le droit français. Il est émis dans un but d’information. Les performances passées ne sauraient préjuger des résultats futurs. Les opinions exprimées ne constituent pas un conseil en investissement, ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de l’une des sociétés du Groupe AXA Investment Managers et sont susceptibles de changer sans préavis.  Nous ne faisons aucune déclaration ni n’offrons aucune garantie explicite ou implicite (y compris à l’égard de tiers) quant à l’exactitude, la fiabilité ou l’exhaustivité des informations contenues dans ce document. Toute mention de stratégie n'est pas destinée à être promotionnelle et n'indique pas la disponibilité d'un véhicule d'investissement.

Gilles Guibout, responsable des actions européennes chez AXA IM, commente l’évolution des marchés actions en Europe en octobre et les perspectives pour les semaines à venir

Après une pause le mois dernier, les marchés actions ont enregistré un net mouvement haussier en octobre. Les incertitudes sur la croissance, notamment en raison de la pénurie de composants qui entrave le bon fonctionnement des chaînes de production, ainsi que l’aggravation de la situation sanitaire pour plusieurs pays émergents n’ont guère pesé face à une nouvelle saison de résultats trimestriels supérieurs aux attentes. La croissance a ralenti aux Etats-Unis et en Chine mais est demeurée vigoureuse dans la zone euro. La capacité des entreprises à augmenter leur prix leur a permis de compenser les difficultés d’approvisionnement et le renchérissement de leurs coûts.  Compte tenu des risques haussiers sur l’inflation, à l’image de la montée du prix du pétrole, la hausse des taux s’est poursuivie, allant même jusqu’à faire poindre la menace de la stagflation.

Sur le mois, le DJ Eurostoxx dividendes réinvestis bondit de 4,02 %. A l’exception des télécoms pénalisés par des résultats en demi-teinte, tous les secteurs sont en hausse. Les services aux collectivités affichent la plus forte progression, portés en partie par la hausse des prix de l’énergie mais surtout par le retrait du projet de loi espagnol de taxes complémentaires visant à limiter la hausse des prix de l’électricité pour le consommateur final. Les valeurs technologiques, l’automobile, les financières et les biens de consommation figurent aussi parmi les plus fortes performances du mois, généralement caractérisées par de bonnes publications de résultats.

Au cours des prochaines semaines, les marchés actions devraient rester bien orientés vu l’absence d’alternative compte tenu de niveaux de taux d’intérêts réels toujours très négatifs, la récente hausse des taux longs restant inférieure à la remontée de l’inflation. Par ailleurs, la saison des résultats trimestriels, dans l’ensemble très bonne, a permis une nouvelle fois de réviser à la hausse les attentes pour l’année et de compresser d’autant les multiples de valorisation sur des niveaux à peine supérieurs aux moyennes de long terme.

Toutefois, des signes de pressions sur les marges commencent à apparaître et la croissance devrait continuer à se normaliser, laissant présager une année 2022 plus compliquée alors même les banques centrales vont progressivement devenir moins accommodantes.

Dans un environnement encore incertain, il nous semble toujours préférable de maintenir une bonne diversification et de limiter les expositions à un facteur en particulier afin de pouvoir faire face à différents scénarios.

Nous continuons d’être sélectifs dans notre choix de valeurs et privilégions toujours les sociétés offrant un réel potentiel de croissance du chiffre d’affaires et/ou des marges, seule garantie, selon nous, de la capacité à générer des résultats et verser des dividendes dans la durée.

Contacts

Hélène Caillet

+33 1 44 45 88 06

helene.caillet@axa-im.com

Julie Marie

+33 1 44 45 50 62

julie.marie@axa-im.com

Alexis Doublet

+33 1 44 45 84 03

alexis.doublet@axa-im.com

Servane Taslé

+33 6 66 58 84 28

servane@steelandholt.com

À propos d’AXA Investment Managers

AXA Investment Managers (AXA IM) est un gestionnaire d’actifs responsable qui investit activement sur le long terme pour la prospérité de ses clients, de ses collaborateurs et de la planète.

Avec environ 879 milliards d’euros d’actifs sous gestion à fin septembre 2021, notre gestion de conviction nous permet d’identifier les opportunités d’investissement que nous considérons comme les meilleures du marché à l’échelle mondiale dans les différentes classes d’actifs alternatives et traditionnelles.

AXA IM est un leader sur le marché de l’investissement vert, social et durable, avec 568 milliards d’euros d’actifs intégrant des critères ESG, durables ou à impact, à fin juin 2021.

Nous nous sommes engagés à atteindre l’objectif de zéro émission nette de gaz à effet de serre d’ici 2050 pour l’ensemble de nos actifs, et à intégrer les considérations ESG dans nos activités, de la sélection des titres à notre culture d’entreprise en passant par la façon dont nous gérons nos opérations au quotidien. Nous souhaitons apporter de la valeur à nos clients grâce à des solutions d’investissement responsables, tout en suscitant des changements significatifs pour la société et l’environnement.

A fin juin 2021, AXA IM emploie plus de 2 488 collaborateurs dans le monde, répartis dans 26 bureaux et 20 pays. AXA IM fait partie du Groupe AXA, un leader mondial de l’assurance et de la gestion d’actifs.

Consultez notre site internet : www.axa-im.com

Suivez-nous sur Twitter @AXAIM et @AXAIM_FR

Suivez-nous sur LinkedIn

Visitez notre espace presse : https://presse.axa-im.fr/

Publié par AXA Investment Managers Paris – Tour Majunga – La Défense 9 – 6, place de la Pyramide – 92800 Puteaux. Société de gestion de portefeuille titulaire de l’agrément AMF N° GP 92-08 en date du 7 avril 1992 S.A au capital de 1.421.906 euros immatriculée au registre du commerce et des sociétés de Nanterre sous le numéro 353 534 506.

Ce communiqué de presse ne doit pas être considéré comme une offre, une sollicitation, une invitation ou une recommandation à souscrire un service ou produit d’investissement et est fourni à titre d’information uniquement. Aucune décision financière ne doit être effectuée sur la base des informations fournies. Ce communiqué de Presse est émis à la date indiquée. Il ne constitue pas une publicité financière telle que définie par le droit français. Il est émis dans un but d’information. Les performances passées ne sauraient préjuger des résultats futurs. Les opinions exprimées ne constituent pas un conseil en investissement, ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de l’une des sociétés du Groupe AXA Investment Managers et sont susceptibles de changer sans préavis.  Nous ne faisons aucune déclaration ni n’offrons aucune garantie explicite ou implicite (y compris à l’égard de tiers) quant à l’exactitude, la fiabilité ou l’exhaustivité des informations contenues dans ce document. Toute mention de stratégie n'est pas destinée à être promotionnelle et n'indique pas la disponibilité d'un véhicule d'investissement.

Gilles Guibout, responsable des actions européennes chez AXA IM, commente l’évolution des marchés actions en Europe en octobre et les perspectives pour les semaines à venir

En juillet, la publication de données économiques chinoises inférieures aux attentes, la pression réglementaire exercée par Pékin sur les valeurs technologiques et la résurgence rapide de l’épidémie de Covid ont fait craindre un ralentissement de la croissance mondiale et ont provoqué un mouvement d’aversion au risque avec une baisse des taux d’intérêt à 10 ans. Aux Etats-Unis, l’ampleur de cette baisse s’est trouvée accentuée par des éléments techniques - concrètement l’absence d’émission nouvelle alors que la banque centrale a maintenu inchangé son programme de rachat - et a offert un soutien aux marchés actions qui profitaient de publications semestrielles dans l’ensemble supérieures aux attentes et qui apparaissent comme la seule alternative de placement liquide.

Sur le mois, le DJ Eurostoxx dividendes réinvestis avance de 1,46%. Si, dans une certaine mesure, les variations de taux sont encore une fois l’un des principaux facteurs explicatifs des performances sectorielles, les nombreuses publications de résultats semestriels ont pu accentuer cette mécanique. Ainsi, les secteurs de l’énergie, de l’automobile et de la finance pâtissent des craintes de ralentissement et de la baisse des taux, tandis qu’à l’inverse le secteur de la technologie retrouve les faveurs des investisseurs porté par de très bons résultats et des perspectives de croissance toujours favorables.

Au cours des prochaines semaines, à la faveur de la trêve estivale, les marchés actions pourraient être volatils compte tenu de volumes traditionnellement plus faibles. L’évolution de la situation sanitaire continuera sans nul doute d’animer le marché, mais ce sont très certainement les déclarations des banquiers centraux réunis à Jackson Hole en fin de mois qui devraient être au centre de l’attention des investisseurs, afin d’y déceler les prochaines évolutions du rythme de rachat d’actifs par la banque centrale. Face à une économie droguée aux injections monétaires et aux plans de soutien, le sevrage s’avère particulièrement délicat et peut entraîner des réactions soudaines et violentes.

Ainsi nous semble-t-il important de maintenir une bonne diversification afin de pouvoir faire face à un éventuel changement brutal de scénario macroéconomique.

Nous continuons d’être sélectifs dans notre choix de valeurs et privilégions toujours les sociétés offrant un réel potentiel de croissance du chiffre d’affaires et/ou des marges, seule garantie, selon nous, de la capacité à générer des résultats et verser des dividendes dans la durée.

Contacts

Hélène Caillet

+33 1 44 45 88 06

helene.caillet@axa-im.com

Julie Marie

+33 1 44 45 50 62

julie.marie@axa-im.com

Servane Taslé

+33 6 66 58 84 28

servane@steelandholt.com

À propos d’AXA Investment Managers

AXA Investment Managers (AXA IM) est un gestionnaire d’actifs responsable qui investit activement sur le long terme pour la prospérité de ses clients, de ses collaborateurs et de la planète.

Avec environ 879 milliards d’euros d’actifs sous gestion à fin septembre 2021, notre gestion de conviction nous permet d’identifier les opportunités d’investissement que nous considérons comme les meilleures du marché à l’échelle mondiale dans les différentes classes d’actifs alternatives et traditionnelles.

AXA IM est un leader sur le marché de l’investissement vert, social et durable, avec 574 milliards d’euros d’actifs intégrant des critères ESG, durables ou à impact, à fin mars 2021.

Nous nous sommes engagés à atteindre l’objectif de zéro émission nette de gaz à effet de serre d’ici 2050 pour l’ensemble de nos actifs, et à intégrer les considérations ESG dans nos activités, de la sélection des titres à notre culture d’entreprise en passant par la façon dont nous gérons nos opérations au quotidien. Nous souhaitons apporter de la valeur à nos clients grâce à des solutions d’investissement responsables, tout en suscitant des changements significatifs pour la société et l’environnement.

A fin décembre 2020, AXA IM emploie plus de 2 440 collaborateurs dans le monde, répartis dans 27 bureaux et 20 pays. AXA IM fait partie du Groupe AXA, un leader mondial de l’assurance et de la gestion d’actifs.

Consultez notre site internet : www.axa-im.com

Suivez-nous sur Twitter @AXAIM et @AXAIM_FR

Suivez-nous sur LinkedIn

Visitez notre espace presse : www.axa-im.com/fr/media-centre

Publié par AXA Investment Managers Paris – Tour Majunga – 6, place de la Pyramide – 92908 Paris La Défense cedex. Société de gestion de portefeuille titulaire de l’agrément AMF N° GP 92-08 en date du 7 avril 1992. S.A. au capital de 1 384 380 euros immatriculée au registre du commerce et des sociétés de Nanterre sous le numéro 353 534 506.

Ce communiqué de presse ne doit pas être considéré comme une offre, une sollicitation, une invitation ou une recommandation à souscrire un service ou produit d’investissement et est fourni à titre d’information uniquement. Aucune décision financière ne doit être effectuée sur la base des informations fournies. Ce communiqué de Presse est émis à la date indiquée. Il ne constitue pas une publicité financière telle que définie par le droit français. Il est émis dans un but d’information. Les performances passées ne sauraient préjuger des résultats futurs. Les opinions exprimées ne constituent pas un conseil en investissement, ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de l’une des sociétés du Groupe AXA Investment Managers et sont susceptibles de changer sans préavis.  Nous ne faisons aucune déclaration ni n’offrons aucune garantie explicite ou implicite (y compris à l’égard de tiers) quant à l’exactitude, la fiabilité ou l’exhaustivité des informations contenues dans ce document. Toute mention de stratégie n'est pas destinée à être promotionnelle et n'indique pas la disponibilité d'un véhicule d'investissement.

Analyses et stratégies d’investissement

Tapering, profit and equity prices

  • As the US Federal Reserve’s tapering announcement is likely imminent, we offer an econometric quantification of the effect of the Fed’s quantitative easing (QE) programme on US equity prices, also taking into account interest rates, earnings and market stress
  • Over the last two years, QE appears to explain nearly all the gains in equity prices in the S&P 500 index. However, we find that the information technology (IT) sector has been much more sensitive to QE than the rest of the index
  • This does not necessarily mean that a correction is unavoidable when tapering starts. In our model, it is only when the Fed actively reduces its balance sheet by selling the securities it has acquired during QE that equity prices would be squeezed. We use our model to simulate what pace of Fed asset offloading would be consistent with stable equity prices
  • Our model suggests that actual corporate earnings have no bearing on the equity valuation of IT stocks – contrary to what we find for the rest of the index. Only expected earnings seem to matter, and they have little connection with actual ones.

This document is for informational purposes only and does not constitute investment research or financial analysis relating to transactions in financial instruments as per MIF Directive (2014/65/EU), nor does it constitute on the part of AXA Investment Managers or its affiliated companies an offer to buy or sell any investments, products or services, and should not be considered as solicitation or investment, legal or tax advice, a recommendation for an investment strategy or a personalized recommendation to buy or sell securities.

 

It has been established on the basis of data, projections, forecasts, anticipations and hypothesis which are subjective. Its analysis and conclusions are the expression of an opinion, based on available data at a specific date.

 

All information in this document is established on data made public by official providers of economic and market statistics. AXA Investment Managers disclaims any and all liability relating to a decision based on or for reliance on this document. All exhibits included in this document, unless stated otherwise, are as of the publication date of this document.

 

Furthermore, due to the subjective nature of these opinions and analysis, these data, projections, forecasts, anticipations, hypothesis, etc. are not necessary used or followed by AXA IM’s portfolio management teams or its affiliates, who may act based on their own opinions. Any reproduction of this information, in whole or in part is, unless otherwise authorised by AXA IM, prohibited.

 

Issued in the UK by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the UK. Registered in England and Wales No: 01431068. Registered Office: 22 Bishopsgate London EC2N 4BQ

 

In other jurisdictions, this document is issued by AXA Investment Managers SA’s affiliates in those countries.

 

Vues d’Iggo

Lost control?

Rate expectations shot up in October. We may get a small rate rise in the UK this week. The shifts in market views have pushed short-term bond yields higher and flattened yield curves. The ball is now in the court of the central bankers. They have a tough job to do in convincing market players of the appropriate path for policy rates in the next couple of years. If they fail market rates go higher and growth prospects will come down.  And for a view on COP26, go to the end.  

Lost control

Central banks have lost (or are very close to losing) control over interest rate expectations as evidence increasingly suggests that post-pandemic rise in inflation risks being more pervasive than thought a few months ago. Since early September, market pricing of where short-term rates will be in 18-months’ time (a window of time typically covered by central bankers’ attempts at forward guidance) has risen sharply across a range of markets. Bond yields have broken above their immediate pre-pandemic levels and rate expectations in Europe and the UK are suggesting the pandemic-era monetary policy settings will be fully reversed by early 2023. We are on the path to normalisation of the interest rate environment.

New era

The risk here is that markets take interest rate expectations higher. Inflation expectations have become un-anchored. Market participants don’t have much collective memory of central bank reactions to higher inflation because they have been conditioned by low and sticky inflation for many years. Now the inflation cat is peaking out of the bag, the incumbent framework for setting rate expectations is perhaps inadequate. It is noteworthy that attempts by central bankers to reverse market expectations have been absent or ineffective in recent weeks. It’s almost as if central banks want the market to do their work for them. The US Federal Reserve (Fed) and the Bank of England (BoE) are openly discussing ending asset purchases. The European Central Bank is struggling to convince the market that the market is wrong on rate expectations and to articulate what will happen to asset purchases next year.

All eyes on the Fed and BoE 

This week is very important as both the Fed and the BoE have the opportunity to re-assert some control over rate expectations or at least provide some guidance as to what is an appropriate path for rate hikes in the coming two years. An interesting thing to note about the Bank of England is that in its inflation forecast, to be published on Thursday, it will have used higher market rates as an input. That, ceteris paribus, would mean a lower inflation and growth forecast. This in itself could provide a natural break on how far further UK rate expectations can rise.

Pricing in low growth

The violence of the moves at the short-end of rate curves has had some collateral damage. Yield curves have flattened and the gap between what inflation markets are pricing in for the short-term versus the longer-term has widened. The 10-year versus 2-year US Treasury yield spread narrowed by over 20bps through October. While being careful not to over-dramatize these moves – I will leave that to other commentators – these developments do represent a lowering of market growth and inflation expectations.

Rate and energy shock not good for household incomes

It’s easy to see why. A rate shock and an energy shock will hit household incomes. This poses a risk to the outlook over the next 1-2 years. So far, risk markets have not got the growth scare. Perhaps credit and equity markets reflect the view that what their friends in the rates market are re-pricing is just a return to monetary conditions as they were in 2019 before anyone had heard of COVID-19. Real interest rates are negative and if lots of economic agents are benefitting from higher nominal growth (wages) then the rise in the cost-of-living might not be so damaging.

But maybe…

There is also the possibility that the central bankers are right on inflation. My view is that we do settle at a higher rate of inflation than has been the case in recent years. However, the very high rates that have printed in recent months are more related to base effects and COVID-19 related supply. Even the shocking 1.3% increase in the US employment cost index could be partly related to the end of furlough and emergency unemployment benefits and companies paying up to entice workers back into employment. That is not necessarily a permanent state. Elsewhere the September reading on the core PCE deflator was back down to 0.2% m/m. If it stays there, the Fed has won the game. In conversation with our equity fund managers, a number have cited an easing in supply chain issues, particularly in SE Asia. Recently the cost of shipping – represented by the Baltic Freight Index – has come off as have prices for copper and natural gas.

Waiting for the sirens call

The rate shock requires central banks to respond. They did a great job in keeping market expectations stable throughout the pandemic. Exiting the pandemic was always going to be tricky but the expansion is at risk if markets push rates up more. Monetary policy can’t do anything about oil prices other than force a collapse in demand and I am sure that is not on anyone’s agenda. But what they can do is send a message saying rates do need to rise but in a controlled way and not as aggressively as some market pricing suggests. If they can do that, the risk of a market rout in bonds and equities will be reduced.

Still at the wheel

I’d like to thank the board at Tottenham Hotspur Football Club for getting ahead of the game in creating an opportunity for the appointment of a new coach. Hopefully they will do it quickly and thus remove one of the potential candidates for taking over at Old Trafford should Manchester United also seek to change its manager. I didn’t fancy Antonio Conte in the Reds’ dugout. Actually, I am still willing to see Ole succeed and the second half display against Spurs suggests that the potential is there. That has to be carried forward in games against Atalanta and Manchester City this week. I just hope the two old boys up top can keep on doing the business.

Lost control?

My last point is about COP26. Have we lost control of the climate? The answer seems to be yes, and the pre-summit noise is not encouraging about Glasgow delivering more aggressive agreements to change that conclusion. But that doesn’t mean we give up. Investors have a central role to play in mobilising finance to support companies and governments that are contributing to a net zero future. More and more needs to be done. The MSCI believes that only 10% of listed companies worldwide have plans that are consistent with a 1.5-degree temperature rise and only 43% with 2 degrees. Glasgow should accelerate the pressures that investors – as owners and creditors – bring to bear on companies to get more of them to pledge to make their business models consistent with a 1.5-degree world. As such, we need to keep doing the analysis on companies from an ESG point of view to understand where they are at and where they are going, we need to stop financing the worst polluters and we need to engage even more actively to get companies to do the right thing in a material and intentional way. We might not get back control, but we can stop the worst-case scenario happening.

This document is for informational purposes only and does not constitute investment research or financial analysis relating to transactions in financial instruments as per MIF Directive (2014/65/EU), nor does it constitute on the part of AXA Investment Managers or its affiliated companies an offer to buy or sell investments, products or services, and should be considered as solicitation or investment, legal or tax advice, a recommendation for an investment strategy or personalized recommendation to buy or sell securities. 

Due to its simplification, this document is partial and opinions, estimates and forecast herein are subjective and subject to change without notice. There is no guarantee forecasts made will come to pass. Data, figures, declaration, analysis, predictions and other information in this document is provided based on our state of knowledge at the time of creation of this document. Whilst every care is taken, no representation or warranty (including liability towards third parties), express or implied, is made as to the accuracy, reliability or completeness of the information contained herein. Reliance upon information in this material is at the sole discretion of the recipient. This material does not contain sufficient information to support an investment decision. 

Issued in the U.K. by AXA Investment Managers UK Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the U.K. Registered in England and Wales, No: 01431068. Registered Office: 22 Bishopsgate, London, EC2N 4BQ